A LOOK INTO THE HUMAN RIGHTS IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN DROUGHT-STRICKEN SOUTHERN MADAGASCAR

Earlier this year Amnesty International commissioned award-winning Malagasy photographer, Pierrot Men to document the human rights impact of climate change and drought in Southern Madagascar. The southern region of the country commonly referred to
as Le Grand Sud (the Deep South) is currently experiencing its worst drought in 40 years, with more than a million people on the brink of famine and thousands more already facing catastrophic famine-like conditions.

Pierrot documented the lives of those most affected by the drought in a series called, Le défi du Grand Sud, The Challenge of the Deep South.

The Challenge of the Deep South

Photos and captions curated by Pierrot Men

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The Challenge of the Deep South
By Pierrot Men
vIRTUAL EXHIBITION

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INDIAN OCEAN CLIMATE NETWORK AND MADLab

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MADLab and the Indian Ocean Climate Network (IOCN) are two Malagasy movements bringing together civil society actors, researchers, social entrepreneurs, young activists, and local community representatives who share a common vision of giving voice to local communities of the Deep South for short- and long-term impact solutions. The two movements are actively working with communities in Southern Madagascar impacted by the increasing drought, particularly women and youth. The India Ocean Climate Network was co-founded in 2015 by Marie Christina Kolo, a Malagasy eco-feminist activist and one of the leading climate voices in the world.

By donating via this link, you can support their work with local communities in southern Madagascar.

An elderly woman carries her farming tools. Ambazoa, May 2021. © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A generation with hope for a better future. Children in Amboasary, May 2021 Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
In Ampanihy and Ambovombe districts, more than a quarter of children are currently suffering from acute malnutrition due to drought. The number of children admitted for treatment for life-threatening severe acute malnutrition in the first three months of 2021 has quadrupled compared with the five-year national average. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Portrait of a woman in Ambovombe. The clay mask is used to protect the skin from the sun. May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
The drought-related food crisis increases begging. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
While waiting for the rain, a few rare trees provide shade for the inhabitants and animals. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A man in a field affected by drought. Andranosira, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
After the rain, some farmers rushed to the nearest town to buy seeds. Andranosira, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Children in Andranosira, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Children’s right to education is also at risk when parents are unable to farm because of drought. Androvavo, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
In the south, drought suspends time for families. Ranomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A woman sows seeds while young men plough the fields, 1. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A woman sows seeds while young men plough the fields, 2. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A woman sows seeds while young men plough the fields, 3. Ambovombe, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A woman sows seeds while young men plough the land, 4. Ambovombe. May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Madagascar is currently experiencing the worst drought in 40 years. In May 2021 the World Food Programme (WFP) and FAO warned that an estimated 1.14 million people in southern Madagascar are currently suffering from acute malnutrition. Ambovombe, March 2021, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Migration remains a common practice when there are recurrent droughts. Many families in Madagascar hoped that moving to a big city like Fort Dauphin would bring them better opportunities. Fort Dauphin, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A family at the market in Fort-Dauphin, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Portrait of an 80-year-old woman. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
The current drought shows that a healthy environment, including a healthy climate, is essential for life with dignity and security. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A family returning from the market in town, along a road ‘flooded’ by the recent exceptional rain. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Portrait of a young herdsman in cultivated fields. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
The consequences of the drought in Manambaro. May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
Travellers on a sand and dust road. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International
A tree caused to lean by the natural sandstorms locally known as “tiomena”, which means “red winds” in Malagasy. Maroalomainty, May 2021 © Pierrot Men for Amnesty International