Argentina: After president stands by his word to legalize abortion, now Congress must pass the bill

Reacting to news that the newly inaugurated Argentinian President, Alberto Fernandez, will introduced within ten days a bill to legalizabortion, Mariela Belski, Executive Director, Amnesty International Argentina, said: 

 “Congress must now listen to the demands of tens of thousands of women who have fought to have control over what they do with their bodies. It´s time for Argentina to join the list of countries that legalize abortion and say ADIÓS to clandestine abortion.

Congress must now listen to the demands of tens of thousands of women who have fought to have control over what they do with their bodies. It´s time for Argentina to join the list of countries that legalize abortion and say ADIÓS to clandestine abortion.
Mariela Belski, Executive Director, Amnesty International Argentina

“Access to safe abortion is a human right. Yet in Argentina abortion continues to be illegal, and is only available to women whose life or health is in danger, or where the pregnancy is the result of rape. Legalizing abortion would be a truly historic step for our country, and women would be able to look forward to a future where their rights are respected and they are treated with compassion. 

Background 

In August 2018, an historic vote to legalise abortion in Argentina fell in the senate. Women’s rights advocates, including Amnesty International, vowed to fight on against what they called a ‘temporary setback’. Tens of thousands of women took to the streets to protest in favour of legal abortion, determined to keep up the pressure on the government.  

Earlier this year, elected president of Argentina, Alberto Fernández, announced that he would push the legalization of abortion as soon as he took office on 10th December 2019. “It is a public health issue that we must solve," he said. 

The debate over decriminalization and legalization of abortion in Argentina has placed abortion firmly on the nation’s public agenda, and younger generations have become vocal in their fight for change on the issue.