• Campagnes

UA 151/93 - Haiti: fear of "disappearance": Joseph Winy Brutus

, N° d'index: AMR 36/017/1993

There is concern for the safety of Joseph Winy Brutus, the Treasurer of the Parti National Democratique et Progressite d'Haiti, PNDPH, who is reported to have "disappeared" on 5 May 1993. According to reports, he had recently been receiving threats because of his political activism and denouncements he had made abroad of the human rights situation in Haiti. The PNDPH forms part of the Front National pour le Changement et la Democratie, FNCD, some of whose members have also "disappeared" or been the victims of apparent extrajudicial execution. These include Camille Cesar and Camille Bazile, killed in October 1991, and Morange Dejean, the driver of an FNCD senator, who has been "disappeared" since July 1992 (see UA 336/91, AMR 36/20/91 and UA 220/92, AMR 36/35/92)

EXTERNAL (for general distribution) AI Index: AMR 36/17/93
Distr: UA/SC
UA 151/93 Fear of "disappearance" 13 May 1993
HAITI: Joseph Winy BRUTUS, Treasurer of the Parti National
Démocratique et Progressite d'Haiti, PNDPH, Haitian National
Democratic and Progressive Party
Amnesty International is concerned for the safety of Joseph Winy Brutus, the Treasurer
of the Parti National Démocratique et Progressite d'Haiti, PNDPH, who is reported
to have "disappeared" on 5 May 1993.
Joseph Winy Brutus, aged about 35 or 36, was on his way to visit a friend on the
afternoon of 5 May but never arrived for his appointment. He was last seen in the
Delmas 33 area of Port-au-Prince. According to reports, he had recently been
receiving threats apparently because of his political party activism and the fact
that he had made denouncements abroad of the human rights situation in Haiti. He
was told that people had his photograph and were looking for him. The PNDPH forms
part of the Front National pour le Changement et la Démocratie, FNCD, National Front
for Change and Democracy, a political coalition which supported the deposed President
Aristide and is now pressing for his return.
Other members of the FNCD have "disappeared" or been the victims of apparent
extrajudicial execution, for example, Camille César and Camille Bazile who were killed
in October 1991 (see UA 336/91, AMR 36/20/91 of October 1991) and Morange Déjean,
the driver of a FNCD senator, who has been "disappeared" since July 1992 (see UA
220/92, AMR 36/35/92 of July 1992).
BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Troops violently overthrew the democratically elected government of President
Jean-Bertrand Aristide, who took office in Haiti on 7 February 1991, in a coup on
the night of 29 to 30 September 1991. Since then Amnesty International has learned
of widespread human rights violations committed by the security forces, including
large numbers of extrajudicial executions, torture and ill-treatment and mass arrests
without warrant. Several of those detained by the authorities remain "disappeared".
These abuses have been carried out by uniformed security force agents or, on some
occasions, by men in civilian clothes ostensibly linked to them.
Recent weeks have seen a marked upsurge in human rights violations in Haiti,
particularly in the capital, Port-au-Prince. Sources in Haiti suggest that the rise
in violations, many of them directed at supporters of ousted President Aristide,
may reflect the military's unease at the negotiations led by United
Nations/Organization of American States (OAS) mediator Dante Caputo, to end the
country's continuing political crisis. The negotiations, in which the United States
is heavily involved, hinge on such issues as the return to office of President Aristide,
the selection of a Prime Minister broadly acceptable to all, and whether an amnesty
will be awarded to military who participated in the coup against President Aristide
and were responsible for human rights violations in its aftermath.
RECOMMENDED ACTION: Please send telegrams/telexes/faxes/express and airmail letters
either in French, English or in your own language:
- expressing concern at the possible abduction of Joseph Winy Brutus on 5 May 1993;
- asking for an immediate inquiry into his whereabouts;
Page 2 of UA 151/93
- urging that if he is in detention, that he be humanely treated and allowed access
to lawyers and relatives;
- urging that if he is in detention, that he be charged with a recognizably criminal
offence or else be released immediately.
APPEALS TO
1. Prime Minister:
Monsieur Marc BAZIN
Premier Ministre
Palais National
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telegrams: Premier Ministre BAZIN, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Faxes: + 509 34 1980, + 509 23 2121
Salutation: Monsieur le Premier Ministre / Dear Prime Minister
2. Military commander of the Armed Forces:
Monsieur le Générale Raoul CEDRAS
Commandant-en-Chef des Forces Armées d'Haiti
Grand Quartier Général des Forces Armées d'Haiti
Rue Geffrard
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telegrams: Commandant-en-Chef des Armées d'Haiti Cedras, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telephone: + 509 22 3935
Telexes: 20391 gqfadh
Faxes: + 509 23 9007, + 509 23 9407
Salutation: Monsieur le Général / Dear General
3. Chief of National Police:
Monsieur le Lt.Colonel Michel FRANÇOIS
Chef de la Police Nationale
Grand Quartier Général de la Police
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telegrams: Chef, Police Nationale, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Salutation: Monsieur le Lt. Colonel / Dear Lt. Colonel
4. Commander of 22th Police Company:
Monsieur le Commandant
Major Lener Renauld
Commandant de la 22ème Compagnie de Police
Delmas 33
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Telegrams: Commandant de la 22eme Compagnie de Police, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Salutation: Monsieur le Commandant / Dear Commander
COPIES OF YOUR APPEALS TO:
Human Rights Organization:
Commission de l'Ogith des Droits Humains et Syndicaux (CODDHUS)
Route de Delmas et Delmas 11
No. 121 bis, 2ème étage
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Newspaper (weekly):
Haiti en Marche
173 N.W. 94 St.
Miami
FL 33150, USA
and to diplomatic representatives of Haiti accredited to your country
PLEASE SEND APPEALS IMMEDIATELY. Check with the International Secretariat, or your
section office, if sending appeals after 24 June 1993.

Dans quelle langue voulez-vous lire le rapport ?