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  • News
  • South Sudan
  • Armed Conflict

South Sudan unity government a chance to ensure justice for possible war crimes

On Wednesday, South Sudan’s rebel leader, Riek Machar was sworn in as first vice president. Yesterday, the new cabinet, which includes former rebels and members of the opposition, was sworn in. The formation of a transitional government of national unity is a big step forward for a nation ravaged by more than two years of armed conflict. But if a lasting peace is to be found, it will need to be built on the foundation of justice, truth and reparation.

Date:
29 April 2016
  • Education
  • Tunisia
  • Women's Rights

What difference does learning about your sexual and reproductive rights make in practice?

Making your own decisions about your health, your body and your sexual life are basic rights. But how do you claim these rights when everyone else around you thinks this is taboo? In Tunisia, activists have developed ways to break the silence about issues no one talks about. “When I first got involved in the My Body My Rights campaign, whenever I would try to raise the issue of sexual and reproductive rights, my friends would stop me or refuse to listen”, says Sabri, 23, activist at Amnesty International Tunisia.

Date:
28 April 2016
  • News
  • Americas
  • Killings and Disappearances

Trigger-happy: Rio’s security forces show their true colours ahead of Olympics

The taxi from Rio’s international airport skirts around the edge of a sprawling favela, where rust-coloured breeze block houses line narrow alleyways, blue plastic water tanks perch on roofs and laundry dances in the breeze under corrugated iron sheets to protect it from the frequent downpours that turn the city’s streets into fast flowing rivers. Children dart in and out of buildings, while vultures scavenge in rubbish piled up along the banks of a river.

Date:
27 April 2016
  • News
  • Mexico
  • Killings and Disappearances

Las sillas vacías de Ayotzinapa

Las tres sillas vacías en medio de la sala lo decían todo. En cada una, el nombre de cada funcionario del alto nivel del gobierno Mexicano encargado de velar por los derechos humanos en el país: Eber Omar Betanzos Torres, Roberto Campa Cifrián y Miguel Ruiz Cabañas Izquierdo. Los tres habían sido invitados por el Grupo Interdisciplinario de Expertos Independientes (GIEI) a la presentación el pasado 24 de abril de su informe final sobre la desaparición forzada de 43 estudiantes de la escuela normal de Ayotzinapa en Septiembre de 2014.

Date:
26 April 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Refugees

Chios chronicle: Here’s how Europe welcomed a young Afghan man who fled the Taliban

You can’t stop a ship dead in its tracks, but sometimes you can change its course. And that’s what happened recently in the Aegean Sea in a new twist in the evolving refugee crisis my colleagues from Amnesty International and I were researching on the Greek islands of Lesvos and Chios. On 5 April, we were on board a night-time ferry from Mytilene, Lesvos, to Chios, when we were informed that our destination had changed because of “the refugee situation”.

Date:
22 April 2016
  • Campaigns
  • Nepal
  • Slums and the Right to Housing

Nepal – When the earthquake came

One year since a devastating earthquake struck Nepal, the government has done nothing to help survivors, says Om Bahadur Silwal. I am a farmer. I live in Lele, Lalitpur, in the central region of Nepal. I was right outside my home when the earthquake hit. I was just about to wash my hands after eating at the edge of the field, when everyone shouted: “It has come!” I ran to a clearing outside and watched as – crash – my house fell.

Date:
22 April 2016
  • Campaigns
  • Myanmar
  • Press Freedom

Myanmar: #Unity5 journalists free at last!

Five media workers from the Unity newspaper in Myanmar have been released following a Presidential pardon. The good news came after months of campaigning for the ‘Unity 5’ from Amnesty members and supporters across the world. Unity journalists Lu Maw Naing, Yarzar Oo, Paing Thet Kyaw, Sithu Soe and the newspaper’s chief executive officer Tint San had been arrested in 2014 after the newspaper published an article about an alleged secret chemical weapons factory in Pakokku Township, Magway Region.

Date:
19 April 2016
  • News
  • Africa
  • Armed Conflict

Chibok two years on: Remembering all Boko Haram’s victims

In September 2014, a 19-year-old woman whom I will call Aisha was celebrating a friend’s wedding in a small village in north-eastern Nigeria when Boko Haram attacked. The fighters killed the groom and many of the male guests. They abducted Aisha, along with other women, including her sister and the bride. They were taken to a Boko Haram camp in Gulak, Adamawa State, home to about 100 other abducted girls.

Date:
13 April 2016
  • News
  • Syria
  • Armed Conflict

Baby Steps on the Long Road to Justice for Atrocities in Syria

The negotiations set to recommence in Geneva on April 11, 2016 and the recent reduction of hostilities in Syria may represent important steps towards a peaceful solution to more than five years of turmoil. Few would not welcome the guns falling silent once and for all and for an end to the suffering of civilians. With war crimes, crimes against humanity and other abuses being committed with impunity in Syria it is essential that justice, truth and reparation form a key part of any agreement.

Date:
11 April 2016
  • Campaigns
  • Myanmar
  • Demonstrations

Myanmar: Student leader finally free!

Good news! Phyoe Phyoe Aung, who was detained in Myanmar after helping to organize largely peaceful student protests, has finally been released more than one year on. Amnesty supporters across the world wrote more than 394,000 letters, emails, tweets and more for Phyoe Phyoe Aung during Write for Rights, our global letter-writing marathon. The good news came after the new government in Myanmar announced it would work to release all prisoners of conscience as soon as possible.

Date:
11 April 2016
  • News
  • Americas
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Virginia Shoppee: A dear friend and a fearless fighter for human rights

Without the tireless work of Virginia Shoppee, the Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet might never have been detained for the crimes against humanity orchestrated during his regime. The former Amnesty International researcher, who died on Monday, spent many months working what felt like 24-hour days to ensure Pinochet would be put on trial. The outcome of his historic detention in London in 1998 was not what she had hoped for, as Pinochet avoided extradition to Spain to stand trial on health grounds.

Date:
7 April 2016
  • News
  • Africa
  • Justice Systems

A historic moment for international justice

Like proverbial buses, it seems you can wait ages for a landmark international justice case, and then four come along at the same time. By any standards, the past fortnight has seen some remarkable developments for international justice. A week ago, on 24 March, Radovan Karadžić was convicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) for his role in genocide and other crimes committed during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), including for the massacre of more than 7,000 Bosnian men and boys in Srebrenica.

Date:
31 March 2016
  • Campaigns
  • Egypt
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

15 brilliant human rights wins in March!

March was an incredible month for human rights – activists were released, unfair laws were changed, and people who committed serious human rights abuses were brought to justice. We’ve picked out 15 successes, wins and pieces of good news, and they were all made possible thanks to your support. 1. Egypt: Teen who challenged torture released after more than two years 20-year-old Mahmoud Hussein (pictured above) was released from prison in Egypt after spending more than two years behind bars for wearing an anti-torture t-shirt.

Date:
31 March 2016
  • News
  • Turkey
  • Internally Displaced People

Five Years of Crisis, Five Million Syrian Refugees

Over the past five years, the crisis in Syria has seen more than 250,000 people killed, tens of thousands forcibly disappeared, and millions displaced inside of Syria. It has also forced five million people to flee the country as refugees. Despite the staggering scale of this crisis, international support for the refugees, and for the handful of countries closest to Syria who are hosting the vast majority of them, has been woefully inadequate.

Date:
30 March 2016
  • Education
  • Discrimination

Three education activities for young people to challenge discrimination

In support of the annual International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination that took place last week, educators from Amnesty International's education network have shared three activities on human rights to empower young people to help challenge racism, stereotypes and prejudice, understand the individuals and communities at risk, and the consequences of discrimination. 1. Racism revealed: using poster artwork to promote discussion on racism This resource includes a selection of 12 poster artwork created by international artists on the theme of racism.

Date:
29 March 2016
  • News
  • Yemen
  • Armed Conflict

Flooding the region with arms is adding fuel to the fire in Yemen

It was a hot, dry day in early July 2015. Salah Basrallah, a farmer in Yemen’s northern region of Saada, stood among a cluster of nine houses that used to comprise his little village of Eram. He surveyed the pulverized scene in silence. He had lost 21 family members in four consecutive airstrikes on his village, including his six children and wife. Nearby lay the remnants of an MK-80 series bomb, similar to those found at many other coalition strike locations and which the United States is known to supply to Saudi Arabia.

Date:
27 March 2016