Turkmenistan

  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Pluralism and the struggle for justice and equality in Indonesia

It is an honour to have been asked to give this year’s Yap Thiam Hien human rights lecture. And I should begin by acknowledging both the importance of his work and the relevance of the example he set. At a time when many people around the world are facing surveillance, arrest, attack and even killings for standing up for their rights, it is very good to honour the memory of a man who was uncompromising in his fight for rights and justice.

Date:
23 March 2017
  • Blog
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

China’s lawyers crackdown: "All he had done was carry out his job"

The last time Jin Bianling heard from her husband was in late November last year. Jiang Tianyong, a prominent Chinese human rights lawyer, had called his wife in the USA from Changsha in China’s Hunan province. He was due to board a train back home to Beijing, after visiting the wife of a detained Chinese human rights lawyer who had been caught up in the country’s ongoing dragnet on human rights lawyers and activists.

Date:
24 January 2017
  • Campaigns
  • China
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Torture in China: Who, What, Why and How

A 2014 global survey  of attitudes towards torture carried out in 21 countries found a vast majority of the 21,000 people surveyed believe there should be clear laws against torture. And rightfully so. Torture is illegal, barbaric and inhumane, and can never be justified. It has been outlawed internationally since 1948, yet it remains rampant in many countries, including in China. Amnesty’s latest report No End In Sight: Torture and Forced Confessions in China finds that China’s criminal justice system is still heavily reliant on forced confessions, usually extracted through torture, and that lawyers who try to challenge torture cases are routinely ignored, harassed or even detained and tortured themselves.

Date:
11 November 2015
  • News
  • China
  • Detention

China’s 'Re-education Through Labour' camps: Replacing one system of repression with another?

 China’s abolition of the “Re-education Through Labour” (RTL) system risks being no more than a cosmetic change, with authorities already stepping up other forms of persecution, Amnesty International said in a briefing released today.  While RTL camps are being shut down, the briefing details how the Chinese authorities are increasingly making use of so-called “black jails”, enforced drug rehabilitation centres, and “brainwashing centres” to take their place.

Date:
17 December 2013
  • News
  • China
  • Detention

China: Abolition of labour camps must lead to wider detention reform

China’s reported decision to abolish "re-education through labour" (RTL) camps nationwide will be little more than a cosmetic measure unless the authorities tackle the deeply entrenched abuses of the country’s overall detention system, Amnesty International. "‘Re-education through labour’ camps are just one piece in the intricate network of arbitrary detention centres used by the Chinese government to punish individuals who exercise their human rights in ways the authorities find threatening," said Corinna-Barbara Francis, China researcher at Amnesty International.

Date:
15 November 2013
  • News
  • China
  • Detention

China detains photographer who exposed labour camp abuses

There are growing fears about the fate of a prominent Chinese photographer and journalist who has not been heard from since security police reportedly detained him at his home in Beijing late last month, Amnesty International said. Du Bin is a photographer and documentary maker who has done extensive work – including a recent film – to uncover torture and other ill-treatment at China’s re-education through labour camps.

Date:
14 June 2013
  • News
  • International Justice

No time for EU to rest on laurels after Nobel Prize win

By Marek Marczynski, Deputy Director of Amnesty International's Europe and Central Asia programmeFor more than a century the Nobel Peace Prize has been the most valued and widely recognized award granted to peace activists, human rights defenders and outstanding statesmen so in Brussels there will have been celebrations that the EU scooped this gong on 12 October. Granting the prize to Martin Luther King, Desmond Tutu or Aung San Suu Kyi helped to drive enormous, long-term human rights changes in their respective countries.

Date:
15 October 2012