Turkmenistan

3,790 results

  • Blog
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Why Sri Lanka's past refuses to be forgotten

It is difficult to imagine anything more traumatic than the sudden disappearance of a loved one. The scramble for any facts that can be established with any clarity. The yearning to know, the pain of imagining. The flame of hope that subsides to a barely perceptible flicker, never quite extinguished by the passage of time. There can be no real certainty, no closure, no moving on. Sithy Ameena, Sandya Ekneligoda and Vathana Suntharajaj all share this sense of perpetual grief.

Date:
3 April 2017
  • News
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka - Victims of disappearance cannot wait any longer for justice

Sri Lanka will not break with its violent past until it reckons with the cruel history of enforced disappearance and delivers justice to as many as 100,000 families who have spent years waiting for it, Amnesty International said today in a new report, revealing the enduring scars of a conflict that has been forgotten by the world. Amnesty International’s report, “Only Justice can heal our wounds”, will be launched by the organization’s Secretary General Salil Shetty at a meeting with families of the disappeared in the northern Sri Lankan town of Mannar.

Date:
3 April 2017
  • Research
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka: "Only justice can heal our wounds": Listening to the demands of families of the disappeared in Sri Lanka

In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability.

Date:
1 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 37/5853/2017
  • Research
  • Africa
  • Armed Conflict

South Sudan: Open Letter from Secretary-General Salil Shetty to President Salva Kiir on prolonged detentions, enforced disappearances, and reported deaths while in government custody

Since the start of South Sudan’s ongoing conflict in December 2013, the National Security Service (NSS) and the Military Intelligence Directorate have carried out hundreds of arbitrary arrests, prolonged detentions and enforced disappearances of individuals perceived as government opponents. Detainees are held without charge or being presented in court, they are often subjected to torture or other ill treatment, are regularly denied access to their family members, and are not provided with adequate medical care.

Date:
28 March 2017
Ref:
AFR 65/5970/2017
  • Campaigns
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Disappearances

UAE: Further information: Human rights defender's whereabouts unknown: Ahmed Mansoor

Prominent Emirati human rights defender and blogger Ahmed Mansoor was arrested at his home in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) on 20 March. His whereabouts are unknown. Amnesty International fears that he has been subjected to enforced disappearance and is at risk of torture and other ill treatment. He is a prisoner of conscience.

Date:
21 March 2017
Ref:
MDE 25/5923/2017
  • Research
  • Zimbabwe
  • Disappearances

Zimbabwe must end enforced disappearances and guarantee respect for freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly

Human Rights Council adopts Universal Periodic Review outcome on Zimbabwe. Harmonising domestic laws with international human rights treaties to which Zimbabwe is a party and the 2013 Constitution, as recommended during the review, would guarantee individuals in Zimbabwe the enjoyment of civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights. Regrettably, four years on this process is not complete, leaving the authorities, in particular the police, enforcing old laws in contravention of the Constitution.

Date:
16 March 2017
Ref:
AFR 46/5896/2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Thailand: Treaty ratification must be followed by domestic action to combat enforced disappearances

Amnesty International welcomes the 10 March vote by Thailand’s National Legislative Assembly to ratify the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance (ICPPED). This is an important step towards combating enforced disappearances and securing truth and justice for victims, including family members. Amnesty International urges authorities to avoid further delays in ratifying the treaty and to eunsure that its obligations to prevent and protect against disappearances become a domestic reality.

Date:
11 March 2017
Ref:
ASA 39/5862/2017
  • Campaigns
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Viet Nam: Further Information: Growing health fears for prisoner of conscience - Trần Thị Thúy

Denied proper medical treatment by prison authorities since April 2015, when she was first diagnosed with a tumour on her uterus, Trần Thị Thúy is no longer able to walk without assistance. A prisoner of conscience, she has been detained since her arrest in 2010 and has expressed fears of death due to appalling prison conditions.

Date:
17 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 41/5727/2017
  • Campaigns
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Myanmar: Further Information: Still no information on hundreds missing Rohingya

Four months after the launch of major security operations in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State, the fate and whereabouts of hundreds of detained Rohingya are still unknown. Amnesty International considers them as victims of enforced disappearances, and are at risk of torture and other ill-treatment and of being subjected to unfair trials.

Date:
15 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5689/2017