Turkmenistan

12,431 results

  • Research
  • Africa
  • Armed Conflict

South Sudan: Renewing the mandate of the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan and addressing the need for accountability for past and on-going crimes under international law and human rights violations

We, the undersigned South Sudanese, regional and international non-governmental organisations, write to urge your delegation to renew and strengthen the mandate and capacity of the UN Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan (the Commission) to address the continued lack of accountability for severe, widespread and on-going crimes under international law and human rights violations and abuses, many of which amount to war crimes and crimes against humanity, during the upcoming 34th session of the UN Human Rights Council (UN HRC).

Date:
23 February 2017
Ref:
AFR 65/5774/2017
  • Campaigns
  • Ethiopia
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

The torturous fields of Ethiopia’s rehabilitation centre

Befeqadu Hailu, a member of the Zone-9 blogging group was arrested for criticizing the State of Emergency Declaration, in an interview he gave to the Voice of America. In this note, he shares what he witnessed during his stay at Awash Sebat Military Training Centre, which was turned into a rehabilitation centre for people arrested during the State of Emergency. Wakoma Tafa was planning to get married on Sunday 9 October 2016, when the police arrested him just three days before his wedding day in Alem Gena -a town 25kms west of Addis Ababa.

Date:
22 February 2017
  • News
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

The human rights violators’ playbook: how to respond to an Amnesty International report

By Anna Neistat, Amnesty International's Senior Director of Research When Amnesty International (Amnesty) released a report documenting the mass hanging of thousands of prisoners in Syria’s Saydnaya Prison, the Syrian government was put on the back foot. President Bashar al-Assad himself responded, calling our report “childish” and “biased”, and even laughed as he said he didn’t know what went on in Saydnaya as he was "in the Presidential Palace”.

Date:
22 February 2017
  • Research
  • Myanmar
  • War Crimes and Crimes Against Humanity

Myanmar: National efforts to investigate Rakhine State violence are inadequate

National efforts to investigate human rights violations and possible crimes against humanity committed by Myanmar security forces in northern Rakhine State are not independent or credible and are unlikely to deliver justice, truth and reparations for victims and their families. The inability – or unwillingness – of the Myanmar authorities to independently and effectively investigate allegations of serious crimes under international law requires the international community to step-in to ensure accountability and prevent further deterioration of the human rights situation.

Date:
21 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5758/2017
  • Research
  • Death Penalty

High-level panel discussion on the question of the death penalty: The death penalty and the prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment - Written statement to the 34th session of the Human Rights Council

This written statement sets out Amnesty International's concerns in relation to the death penalty and the prohibition of torture and other ill-treatment. Amnesty International opposes the death penalty absolutely, in all cases without exception, regardless of the nature or circumstances of the crime; guilt, innocence or other characteristics of the individual; or the method used by the State to carry out the execution.

Date:
17 February 2017
Ref:
IOR 40/5734/2017
  • Campaigns
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Myanmar: Further Information: Still no information on hundreds missing Rohingya

Four months after the launch of major security operations in Myanmar’s northern Rakhine State, the fate and whereabouts of hundreds of detained Rohingya are still unknown. Amnesty International considers them as victims of enforced disappearances, and are at risk of torture and other ill-treatment and of being subjected to unfair trials.

Date:
15 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5689/2017
  • Research
  • Africa
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Burundi: Amnesty International’s Written Statement to the 34th Session of the UN Human Rights Council (27 February – 24 March 2017)

In recent months the Government of Burundi has imposed further restrictions on civil society, on top of an already severe clampdown since the beginning of the crisis in April 2015. Amnesty International shares the concerns raised by a group of UN Special Procedures on 6 February in this regard.

Date:
14 February 2017
Ref:
AFR 16/5678/2017
  • Research
  • Tunisia
  • Armed Conflict

Tunisia: ‘We want an end to the fear’: Abuses under Tunisia’s state of emergency

In response to a series of armed attacks in 2015 and 2016 that shook the country, the Tunisian authorities have stepped up security measures and relied on emergency laws. Cases documented by Amnesty International show that individuals have been arbitrarily arrested, without judicial warrants. Some have been subjected to torture and other ill-treatment in custody. The authorities have applied arbitrary restrictions on individuals’ movement inside the country.

Date:
13 February 2017
Ref:
MDE 30/4911/2017
  • Research
  • Myanmar
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Myanmar: Urgent action needed to address deteriorating human rights situation Amnesty International’s written statement to the 34th session of the UN Human Rights Council (27 February-24 March 2017)

This written statement highlights how, one year after the National League for Democracy (NLD)-led government took office, the deterioration in the human rights situation in Myanmar requires immediate and urgent action from the UN Human Rights Council.

Date:
13 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5683/2017
  • News
  • Tunisia
  • Unlawful Detention

Tunisia: Abuses in the name of security threatening reforms

Tunisian security forces’ reliance on the brutal tactics of the past, including torture, arbitrary arrests, detentions and restrictions on travel of suspects as well as harassment of their family members, is threatening Tunisia’s road to reform, said Amnesty International in a new report published today. In response to a series of armed attacks since March 2015 which shook the country, the authorities have stepped up security measures, increasingly relying on emergency laws, many of which are inconsistent with human rights obligations.

Date:
10 February 2017