Turkmenistan

10,101 results

  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Discrimination

Taiwan moves closer to marriage equality after milestone court ruling

A landmark ruling by Taiwan’s highest court means it is close to becoming the first in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage, Amnesty International said. On Wednesday, judges in Taiwan’s Constitutional Court ruled that the country’s current marriage law is unconstitutional as it discriminates against same-sex couples. The judges have given lawmakers two years to amend or enact relevant laws. “The judges have today said yes to marriage equality.

Date:
24 May 2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • LGBT Rights

South Korea: Soldier convicted in outrageous military gay witch-hunt

South Korea’s military must immediately end a bigoted hunt to root out gay personnel, Amnesty International said, after a serving soldier was convicted of having a same-sex relationship. The soldier, whose identity remains anonymous, was given a six month prison sentence suspended for one year at a military trial on Wednesday. The soldier fell down when the judgment was delivered and was taken to hospital.

Date:
24 May 2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Discrimination

What does it take to solve a statelessness crisis?

Three years ago today, authorities in the Dominican Republic passed a law seeking to address a statelessness crisis that has effectively stripped thousands of people off their Dominican nationality and with it,  denied them a range of human rights. The crisis exploded in 2013, after a ruling by the Dominican Republic’s top Court that retroactively applied to anyone born after 1929 to undocumented foreign parents.

Date:
23 May 2017
  • News
  • United States of America
  • Women and Girls

USA Health of pregnant women being jeopardized by punitive laws

A set of US laws which claim to promote maternal and infant health are in fact driving pregnant women away from vital health services, jeopardizing their wellbeing and violating their right to health, according to a new report published by Amnesty International today. Criminalizing Pregnancy: Policing Pregnant Women Who Use Drugs in the USA, highlights the impact of pregnancy criminalization laws, especially those which are used to arrest and prosecute women who use drugs based on a belief that they are harming their fetuses.

Date:
23 May 2017
  • Research
  • United States of America
  • Women and Girls

USA: Criminalizing pregnancy: policing pregnant women who use drugs in the USA

In the USA, pregnant women lie at the center of a contested battleground over their sexual and reproductive rights. A series of laws police the behavior of pregnant women and particularly impact those who are marginalized and those who use drugs. Collectively called pregnancy criminalization laws, this report provides a basic overview of the impact of these laws on women’s human rights and access to healthcare across the USA, and specifically focuses on two criminal laws in Alabama and Tennessee.

Date:
23 May 2017
Ref:
AMR 51/6203/2017
  • Campaigns
  • Iran
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Iran: Further information: Iran: Women's rights activist in critical health: Atena Daemi

The health of Iranian women’s rights activist, Atena Daemi, has sharply deteriorated. After 46 days on hunger strike, she is critically ill and her body has started rejecting water. Despite doctors’ warnings, the authorities are still refusing to transfer her to a hospital outside prison for specialist medical care. She is a prisoner of conscience.

Date:
23 May 2017
Ref:
MDE 13/6322/2017
  • News
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Armed Conflict

Saudi Arabia: Trump visit risks giving green light to violations of human rights

As US President Donald Trump embarks on his first foreign visit to attend the Riyadh summit in Saudi Arabia, counter terrorism and security will dominate his discussions with Gulf and Arab state leaders. The President is also expected to unveil a multi-billion dollar arms deal with Saudi Arabia. The glaring absence of human rights from Trump’s agenda will only embolden further violations in a region where governments flout the rights of their own people in the name of the fight against terror, and violate international humanitarian law in conflicts fueled on large part by US arms transfers, said Amnesty International.

Date:
19 May 2017
  • News
  • Indonesia
  • Discrimination

Indonesia: Revoke the caning sentence of gay men in Aceh

Responding to the sentencing of two gay men to 85 lashes each for consensual same-sex sexual relations, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific, Josef Benedict, said: “The Aceh authorities must immediately revoke the conviction and the caning sentences and end the use of this punishment, which constitutes cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment and may amount to torture.

Date:
17 May 2017
  • Research
  • Africa
  • Terrorism

Shut down for speaking out. Human rights defenders at risk in West and Central Africa

Human rights defenders have long played an essential role in standing up for freedom, opposing repression and promoting social justice across West and Central Africa. Yet rather than heralding these efforts to promote and defend universal civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights, state authorities have far too often responded with hostility and an intolerance of dissent.

Date:
16 May 2017
Ref:
ACT 30/6170/2017
  • News
  • Africa
  • Censorship and Free Speech

West and Central Africa: Attacks on human rights activists reach dangerous levels

Amnesty International launches new global campaign, ‘Brave’, to stop the wave of attacks against those defending human rights At least 87 human rights defenders and 48 journalists arbitrarily arrested in West Africa since 2014 One protester killed every five days during demonstrations States across the region deploy unlawful killings, arrests, surveillance and administrative sanctions to inhibit human rights work Human rights defenders, journalists and protesters in West and Central Africa are facing ever-higher levels of persecution, intimidation and violence, warned Amnesty International today as it launched a new global campaign demanding an end to the onslaught of attacks against brave individuals standing up to injustice.

Date:
15 May 2017
  • Research
  • Africa
  • Armed Conflict

Sudan: ‘Uninvestigated, unpunished’: Human rights violations against Darfuri students

This report documents human rights violations experienced by students from Darfur in Sudan since 2014. These violations include: suppression of freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly; arbitrary arrests; torture and other ill-treatment in detention; and unlawful killings. Since the conflict started in Darfur in 2003, the police and the security services have arbitrarily arrested and detained at least 10,000 students from Darfur.

Date:
15 May 2017
Ref:
AFR 54/4848/2017
  • Research
  • United States of America
  • Discrimination

USA: "My family was in shock" - The harm caused by President Trump's executive orders on travel to the US

US President Donald Trump had been in office for exactly a week when he issued an executive order barring the entry of people from seven Muslim-majority countries and slamming the door on refugees. Besides documenting the harms caused by the first executive order during the relatively brief period in which it was in effect, this briefing paper describes the situations of people who are still awaiting US visas, some of whom could be irreparably harmed if the US courts were to rule that the second executive order is constitutional.

Date:
12 May 2017
Ref:
AMR 51/6207/2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Discrimination

USA: Return to bigoted anti-Muslim travel ban would cause immeasurable harm

The Trump administration’s executive order on travel, scheduled for federal appeals court review on Monday, would harm both immigrants and US citizens if allowed to enter into effect, warns Amnesty International in a briefing paper released today. “President Trump’s travel ban order separated families and sent a message of bigotry and intolerance,” said Joanne Mariner, Senior Crisis Response Adviser at Amnesty International.

Date:
12 May 2017
  • Research
  • Russian Federation
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Russian Federation: Detained members of corruption watchdog are prisoners of conscience and should be freed immediately

On 20 April the Supreme Court of the Russian Federation banned Jehovah’s Witnesses in Russia on the grounds that they are an extremist organization. This means that the Administrative Centre and all 395 regional organisations of Jehovah’s Witnesses are subject to liquidation, and their property can now be seized by the state. Those who continue to manifest their faith as Jehovah’s Witnesses including participating in worship, leading religious activities, recruiting others or fundraising despite the ban will be liable to criminal prosecution and can face imprisonment for up to 12 years.

Date:
11 May 2017
Ref:
EUR 46/6229/2017