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  • News
  • Australia
  • Corporate Accountability

Spanish corporate giant Ferrovial makes millions from Australia’s torture of refugees on Nauru

A major corporation responsible for running the Australian government’s refugee “processing” centre on Nauru is making millions of dollars from a system that amounts to torture of refugees and people seeking asylum, Amnesty International said today. A new briefing, ‘Treasure I$land’, exposes how Spanish multinational Ferrovial and its Australian subsidiary Broadspectrum are complicit in, and reaping vast profits from, Australia’s cruel and secretive refugee “processing” system on the Pacific island.

Date:
5 April 2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Business and Human Rights

Australia: Treasure I$land: How companies are profiting from Australia's abuse of refugees on Nauru

Under the Government of Australia’s “offshore processing" regime, everyone who arrives in Australia by boat seeking asylum is forcibly taken to a "Refugee Processing Centre" on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea or the Pacific island of Nauru. This briefing exposes how companies Broadspectrum and Ferrovial are complicit in and reaping vast profits from the abusive and secretive system on Nauru, acting contrary to their responsibility to respect human rights and exposing themselves to potential liability under civil and criminal law.

Date:
5 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 12/5942/2017
  • News
  • Corporate Accountability

USA: Suspending conflict minerals law would throw a cloak of secrecy over rogue business practices

President Donald Trump’s proposed suspension of a ground-breaking transparency law on conflict minerals will reward irresponsible business practices and seriously undermine global human rights protections, Amnesty International said today. “The conflict minerals law is a vital way of breaking the chain between horrific human rights abuses in Central Africa and consumer products like smart phones. By requiring companies to be transparent about how they source minerals, it throws light on shameful and secretive business practices that allow companies to benefit from conflict and abuse.

Date:
10 February 2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Business and Human Rights

Myanmar: Mountain of trouble: Human rights abuses continue at Myanmar’s Letpadaung mine

This briefing examines the current human rights situation at Myanmar's largest copper mine, the Letpadaung mine. The operating company, a subsidiary of China’s Wanbao Mining, intends to extend the mine’s perimeter, putting hundreds of people at risk of forced eviction from their homes and farmland. The company has also failed to undertake an adequate environmental assessment of the mine, putting the safety of the neighbouring communities at risk.

Date:
10 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5564/2017
  • News
  • Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

UK: Shell ruling gives green light for corporations to profit from abuses overseas

A UK High Court ruling that two Niger Delta communities devastated by oil spills cannot have their claims against Shell heard in the UK could rob them of justice and allow UK multinationals to commit abuses overseas with impunity, Amnesty International said today. The High Court ruled today that Royal Dutch Shell cannot be held responsible for the actions of its Nigerian subsidiary Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Ltd.

Date:
26 January 2017
  • News
  • South Africa
  • Corporate Accountability

United Kingdom: Lonmin shareholders must probe broken promises on housing

Shareholders of the UK-based platinum mining giant Lonmin Plc must ask what steps the company is taking to improve the appalling conditions in which it houses its workers, and which contributed to a labour dispute that left 34 striking miners dead in 2012, Amnesty International said today ahead of Lonmin’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) on 26 January in London. The organization has documented how Lonmin’s workforce at its platinum mine in Marikana, South Africa, are still living in squalor in spite of legally binding commitments made by the company to build 5,500 new houses more than a decade ago.

Date:
24 January 2017
  • Research
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar - New name, old system? Qatar's new employment law and abuse of migrant workers

Qatar has been under intense international scrutiny for its treatment of migrant workers since being awarded the rights to host the 2022 World Cup. Particular focus has been placed on the notorious 2009 sponsorship law, which ties workers to their employers, putting them at risk of forced labour. In December 2016, this law is being replaced. This briefing examines whether its replacement, Law No. 21 of 2015, will make any significant improvement to the lives of workers in the country.

Date:
12 December 2016
Ref:
MDE 22/5242/2016
  • News
  • Business and Human Rights

Palm Oil: Global brands profiting from child and forced labour

Unilever, Nestlé, Procter & Gamble among nine household names contributing to labour abuse The world’s most popular food and household companies are selling food, cosmetics and other everyday staples containing palm oil tainted by shocking human rights abuses in Indonesia, with children as young as eight working in hazardous conditions, said Amnesty International in a new report published today.

Date:
30 November 2016
  • News
  • Business and Human Rights

Palm Oil and human rights: What you need to know

The rapid expansion of palm oil has led to extensive deforestation, destruction of the rainforests and considerable harm to wildlife species. It has also led to appalling labour rights abuses against workers, according to an Amnesty International investigation. Five key facts about palm oil: 1. Palm oil is used in half of your daily products Palm oil and palm based ingredients are found in approximately 50% of supermarket products.

Date:
30 November 2016
  • News
  • Indonesia
  • Corporate Accountability

Case studies: Palm oil and human rights abuses

Many of the world’s most popular food and household companies are selling food, cosmetics and other everyday staples containing palm oil, an ingredient that is tainted by shocking human rights abuses. Amnesty International investigated labour exploitation on plantations in Indonesia that provide palm oil to Wilmar, the world’s largest processor and merchandiser of palm oil. We spoke to 120 workers, including children, who work on palm plantations in Kalimantan and Sumatra in Indonesia and heard about the human rights abuses that go into making many of our favourite household brands.

Date:
30 November 2016
  • Research
  • Indonesia
  • Business and Human Rights

Indonesia: Company responses to Amnesty International regarding palm oil in global operations

While conducting research into labour abuse on palm oil plantations in Indonesia, Amnesty International traced the movement of palm oil from specific refineries or mills directly supplied by the plantations investigated to several well-known consumer brands. Each of these companies were contacted and asked about their palm oil supply and their human rights due diligence practices. These were their responses.

Date:
30 November 2016
Ref:
ASA 21/5230/2016