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Russia: Court halts journalist’s deportation to Uzbekistan but detains him despite abuse claims

In response to Moscow City Court’s decision to suspend the deportation to Uzbekistan of openly gay journalist Khudoberdi Nurmatov (better known by his journalist alias Ali Feruz) but to keep him in detention while his case is reviewed by the European Court of Human Rights, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for Europe and Central Asia, Denis Krivosheev, said: “The suspension of Ali Feruz’s deportation to Uzbekistan - where he faces a real risk of persecution and torture, and where homosexuality is a crime - is a positive step.

Date:
8 August 2017
  • News
  • Russian Federation
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Russia: Decision to deport journalist to Uzbekistan puts him at risk of persecution and torture

The Russian authorities must immediately overturn their decision to deport asylum seeker Khudoberdi Nurmatov, better known under his journalist alias Ali Feruz, to Uzbekistan, Amnesty International said today. “Ali Feruz is openly gay, a human rights activist and a correspondent for the independent Novaya Gazeta newspaper. This is a near-lethal combination for someone who is about to be handed over to Uzbekistan, where “sodomy” is a crime and torture is endemic,” said Denis Krivosheev, Deputy Director for Europe and Central Asia at Amnesty International.

Date:
2 August 2017
  • Campaigns
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Russian Federation: Further information: Detained journalist facing imminent deportation: Khudoberdi Nurmatov (Ali Feruz)

On 1 August, the Moscow Basmanniy Court ruled that openly gay journalist and activist Khudoberdi Nurmatov (also known as Ali Feruz) must be forcibly returned from Russia to Uzbekistan. If returned, he will be at risk of torture and imprisonment for his sexual orientation. The journalist has nine days to appeal the decision.

Date:
2 August 2017
Ref:
EUR 46/6865/2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Uzbekistan: Time for deeds, not words: achieving positive human rights change in Uzbekistan

On the occasion of the EU-Uzbekistan Cooperation Council meeting, which will take place in Brussels on 17 July 2017, the Association for Human Rights in Central Asia (AHRCA), International Partnership for Human Rights (IPHR) and Amnesty International urge the EU to emphasise the need for concrete changes in the human rights situation in Uzbekistan.

Date:
17 July 2017
Ref:
EUR 62/6749/2017
  • News
  • Uzbekistan
  • Internet and Social Media

Uzbekistan: Tentacles of mass surveillance spread across borders

The Uzbekistani government is conducting unlawful surveillance of its citizens and fostering a climate of fear and uncertainty for Uzbekistani people in Europe, said Amnesty International in a new report and film launched today. ‘We Will Find You, Anywhere’ looks at the impact of unlawful government surveillance on the lives of seven Uzbekistani people, living within and outside the country. The cases include a refugee living in Sweden, whose correspondence with family members back home was monitored, and a journalist forced to flee to France after being watched by secret service officials.

Date:
31 March 2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Uzbekistan: “We will find you, anywhere”: The global shadow of Uzbekistani surveillance

Surveillance in Uzbekistan helps reinforce the already repressive environment for human rights defenders, journalists, political activists and others in Uzbekistan. Unlawful surveillance in Uzbekistan keeps families apart and harms the rights to free expression around the world, and limits the ability of people inside and outside of Uzbekistan to receive information. This briefing highlights stories of seven Uzbekistani people, in Uzbekistan and in the diaspora, whose human rights have been negatively affected by the unlawful surveillance of the government of Uzbekistan.

Date:
31 March 2017
Ref:
EUR 62/5974/2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • International Organizations

Uzbekistan: Amnesty International’s submission to the Council of Europe Committee of Ministers: Garabayev v. Russian Federation (no.38411/02) group of cases

This submission summarizes and updates the report by Amnesty International Fast-Track to Torture: Abductions and Forcible Returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, published in April 2016. It focuses on the most pressing issues of concern to the organization, also reflected in the decision on individual and general measures adopted by the Committee at its 1250th meeting (8-10 March 2016).

Date:
7 March 2017
Ref:
EUR 62/5839/2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Asylum

Uzbekistan: Asylum-seeker returned from Russia to Uzbekistan in blatant violation of international law

On 1 July 2016, Olim Ochilov, a 27-year-old Uzbekistani asylum seeker, was forcibly returned from Russia to Uzbekistan in blatant disregard of interim measures by the European Court of Human Rights (the European Court). On 28 June 2016, the European Court issued Rule 39 interim measures on Olim Ochilov’s case to stop his forcible return to Uzbekistan, where he is at the real risk of torture.

Date:
19 July 2016
Ref:
EUR 62/4488/2016
  • Campaigns
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Fleeing torture, returned to torture: Uzbekistan to Russia, and back again

In June 2014, Mirsobir Khamidkariev, a young film producer from Uzbekistan, was abducted in broad daylight in the centre of Moscow city centre. He was sitting in a taxi, waiting outside a pharmacy for his wife and young son, when two men suddenly got into the taxi and forced the driver to speed away. Two days later he was flown back to Uzbekistan – the country he had fled in order to seek asylum – and tortured.

Date:
1 June 2016
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Uzbekistan: Fast-track to torture: Abductions and forcible returns from Russia to Uzbekistan

The Uzbekistani authorities have relentlessly pursued the extradition or otherwise involuntary return from Russia of hundreds of people they suspect of criminal activity or whom they label as opponents or threats to national security. Where extradition has been denied or obstructed, Uzbekistani security forces have abducted asylum-seekers from Russia. This briefing shows that torture continues to be pervasive in Uzbekistani prisons and detention centres as a means to obtain forced confessions, punish prisoners and their families, and to incriminate others and extort money.

Date:
21 April 2016
Ref:
EUR 62/3740/2016
  • News
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Uzbekistan: Russian authorities complicit in forcibly returning hundreds of asylum-seekers and migrants to face torture

Mirsobir Khamidkariev, an Uzbekistani film producer and businessman, was forcibly returned from Russia, tortured and sent to a prison camp Hundreds of asylum-seekers, refugees and migrant workers have been deported and even abducted in forced returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, where they have been subjected to torture, said Amnesty International in a briefing released today. The briefing, Fast-track to Torture: Abductions and Forcible Returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, examines how the Russian authorities have cooperated with Uzbekistan in hundreds of deportation cases despite clear risks that individuals could be tortured upon return.

Date:
21 April 2016