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Uzbekistan: Tentacles of mass surveillance spread across borders

The Uzbekistani government is conducting unlawful surveillance of its citizens and fostering a climate of fear and uncertainty for Uzbekistani people in Europe, said Amnesty International in a new report and film launched today. ‘We Will Find You, Anywhere’ looks at the impact of unlawful government surveillance on the lives of seven Uzbekistani people, living within and outside the country. The cases include a refugee living in Sweden, whose correspondence with family members back home was monitored, and a journalist forced to flee to France after being watched by secret service officials.

Date:
31 March 2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Uzbekistan: “We will find you, anywhere”: The global shadow of Uzbekistani surveillance

Surveillance in Uzbekistan helps reinforce the already repressive environment for human rights defenders, journalists, political activists and others in Uzbekistan. Unlawful surveillance in Uzbekistan keeps families apart and harms the rights to free expression around the world, and limits the ability of people inside and outside of Uzbekistan to receive information. This briefing highlights stories of seven Uzbekistani people, in Uzbekistan and in the diaspora, whose human rights have been negatively affected by the unlawful surveillance of the government of Uzbekistan.

Date:
31 March 2017
Ref:
EUR 62/5974/2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • International Organizations

Uzbekistan: Amnesty International’s submission to the Council of Europe Committee of Ministers: Garabayev v. Russian Federation (no.38411/02) group of cases

This submission summarizes and updates the report by Amnesty International Fast-Track to Torture: Abductions and Forcible Returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, published in April 2016. It focuses on the most pressing issues of concern to the organization, also reflected in the decision on individual and general measures adopted by the Committee at its 1250th meeting (8-10 March 2016).

Date:
7 March 2017
Ref:
EUR 62/5839/2017
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Asylum

Uzbekistan: Asylum-seeker returned from Russia to Uzbekistan in blatant violation of international law

On 1 July 2016, Olim Ochilov, a 27-year-old Uzbekistani asylum seeker, was forcibly returned from Russia to Uzbekistan in blatant disregard of interim measures by the European Court of Human Rights (the European Court). On 28 June 2016, the European Court issued Rule 39 interim measures on Olim Ochilov’s case to stop his forcible return to Uzbekistan, where he is at the real risk of torture.

Date:
19 July 2016
Ref:
EUR 62/4488/2016
  • Campaigns
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Fleeing torture, returned to torture: Uzbekistan to Russia, and back again

In June 2014, Mirsobir Khamidkariev, a young film producer from Uzbekistan, was abducted in broad daylight in the centre of Moscow city centre. He was sitting in a taxi, waiting outside a pharmacy for his wife and young son, when two men suddenly got into the taxi and forced the driver to speed away. Two days later he was flown back to Uzbekistan – the country he had fled in order to seek asylum – and tortured.

Date:
1 June 2016
  • Research
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Uzbekistan: Fast-track to torture: Abductions and forcible returns from Russia to Uzbekistan

The Uzbekistani authorities have relentlessly pursued the extradition or otherwise involuntary return from Russia of hundreds of people they suspect of criminal activity or whom they label as opponents or threats to national security. Where extradition has been denied or obstructed, Uzbekistani security forces have abducted asylum-seekers from Russia. This briefing shows that torture continues to be pervasive in Uzbekistani prisons and detention centres as a means to obtain forced confessions, punish prisoners and their families, and to incriminate others and extort money.

Date:
21 April 2016
Ref:
EUR 62/3740/2016
  • News
  • Uzbekistan
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Uzbekistan: Russian authorities complicit in forcibly returning hundreds of asylum-seekers and migrants to face torture

Mirsobir Khamidkariev, an Uzbekistani film producer and businessman, was forcibly returned from Russia, tortured and sent to a prison camp Hundreds of asylum-seekers, refugees and migrant workers have been deported and even abducted in forced returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, where they have been subjected to torture, said Amnesty International in a briefing released today. The briefing, Fast-track to Torture: Abductions and Forcible Returns from Russia to Uzbekistan, examines how the Russian authorities have cooperated with Uzbekistan in hundreds of deportation cases despite clear risks that individuals could be tortured upon return.

Date:
21 April 2016
  • News
  • El Salvador
  • Censorship and Free Speech

World’s biggest human rights campaign puts spotlight on abuses

People who speak out against leaders face increasing risk of punishment or prosecution, Amnesty International said today as it launched the world’s biggest human rights campaign. During the annual Write for Rights campaign, from 4-17 December, hundreds of thousands of Amnesty International supporters and activists around the world will send letters, emails, SMS messages, faxes and tweets calling for the release of activists jailed for peaceful dissent, supporting victims of torture and pointing a spotlight on other human rights abuses.

Date:
4 December 2015
  • Campaigns
  • United States of America
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

10 ways your words are changing lives

As we get ready for Write for Rights 2015, our global letter-writing marathon, we look at how your words and ongoing campaigning made change happen after the 2014 campaign. 1. Freedom in Nigeria The Governor of Delta State responded to pressure from Amnesty supporters and granted a full pardon to Moses Akatugba, who had been sentenced to death aged 16 for stealing three phones. 2. Investigating torture in the Philippines The Philippines police announced that letters sent by a “human rights organisation” – which we can confidently say is Amnesty International – have prompted them to investigate the shocking torture of Jerryme Corre, who was electrocuted, punched and threatened with death.

Date:
13 November 2015