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  • Blog
  • United Kingdom
  • Internet and Social Media

UK Government targeting WhatsApp is Another Security Red Herring

Anyone who hoped that the debate about encryption had already been put to bed, sadly, was wrong. Today, UK Home Secretary Amber Rudd will meet with technology companies including Facebook and Google to discuss encrypted messaging services, with a view to “persuading” the companies to gain access to encrypted communications. Earlier this week, in the wake of the Westminster terrorist attack, Rudd became the latest state official to blame encrypted messaging services like WhatsApp for ostensibly facilitating terrorist attacks.

Date:
30 March 2017
  • Research
  • Algeria
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Suggested recommendations to States considered during the 27th session of the Universal Periodic Review, 1 – 12 May 2017

This document contains Amnesty International's suggested recommendations for 13 states - Algeria; Bahrain; Brazil; Finland; India; Indonesia; Morocco; Netherlands; Philippines; Poland; South Africa; Tunisia and United Kingdom - coming up for review in the 27th session of the UPR Working Group on 1-12 May 2017 aimed at addressing human rights challenges and improving respect for human rights in the states under review.

Date:
1 February 2017
Ref:
IOR 40/5941/2017
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Nigel Rodley 1941 - 2017

Nigel Rodley’s outstanding achievement, earning him a place in history, was to be an architect of the process leading to the international treaty instrumental in the global fight against torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. He was also a kind and modest man who cared intensely about individuals’ human rights and whose commitment, humanity and sincerity inspired the deep respect and lasting affection of his colleagues.

Date:
26 January 2017
  • News
  • Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

UK: Shell ruling gives green light for corporations to profit from abuses overseas

A UK High Court ruling that two Niger Delta communities devastated by oil spills cannot have their claims against Shell heard in the UK could rob them of justice and allow UK multinationals to commit abuses overseas with impunity, Amnesty International said today. The High Court ruled today that Royal Dutch Shell cannot be held responsible for the actions of its Nigerian subsidiary Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Ltd.

Date:
26 January 2017
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Censorship and Free Speech

EU: Orwellian counter-terrorism laws stripping rights under guise of defending them

Sweeping new laws are driving Europe into a deep and dangerous state of permanent securitization, Amnesty International said on the publication of a comprehensive human rights analysis of counter-terrorism measures across 14 EU member states. Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe reveals how a deluge of laws and amendments passed with break-neck speed, is undermining fundamental freedoms and dismantling hard-won human rights protections.

Date:
17 January 2017
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

UK: Highest court dismisses Government attempt to block cases seeking justice for UK involvement in torture and kidnap abroad

Leading human rights organisations have hailed a landmark decision of the UK Supreme Court to hold the UK Government accountable for its role in human rights abuses overseas. The country’s highest court issued today a long-awaited judgment in the two joined appeals in Belhaj and Others v. Jack Straw & Others and Rahmatullah v. Ministry of Defence and Another. The Court ruled that the UK Government could not rely on the legal doctrines of sovereign immunity and foreign act of state to escape claims in the two cases alleging UK involvement in breaches of human rights by foreign governments.

Date:
17 January 2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe - Executive Summary

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in a spate of violent attacks in European Union (EU) states between January 2015 and December 2016. They were shot by armed men, blown up in suicide bomb attacks and deliberately run over as they walked in the street. These callous crimes did not just target individuals; they were also attacks on societies, on how people live and what people think. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5343/2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in violent attacks in the European Union in 2015 and 2016. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent. This report gives a bird’s eye view of the national security landscape and shows just how widespread and deep the “securitization” of Europe has become. It focuses on eight themes: states of emergency, principle of legality, right to privacy, freedom of expression, right to liberty, freedom of movement, stripping of nationality, and the prohibition on sending people to places where they risk torture.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5342/2017
  • Research
  • United Kingdom
  • Refugees

United Kingdom: Weakening protections: Amnesty International submission for the UN Universal Periodic Review – 27th Session of the UPR Working Group, May 2017

Amnesty International notes with regret that the UK has expressed an intention to replace its domestic Human Rights Act with what appears likely to be a less protective Bill of Rights, and that it has been highly critical of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in this regard. There have also been reports at the close of 2016 suggesting the government intends to withdrawn altogether from the European Convention on Human Rights should it win the next election.

Date:
13 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 45/5488/2017
  • Research
  • United Kingdom
  • Justice Systems

United Kingdom: Cuts that hurt: The impact of legal aid cuts in England on access to justice

The UK government has dramatically reduced access to legal aid for tens of thousands of people in civil cases. In doing so it has stripped away a vital element of support for a fair and just legal system. Those hardest hit by the cuts are some of the most disadvantaged and marginalised people in our society: children and young people, and people with additional vulnerabilities, including those with mental health problems or disabilities.

Date:
11 October 2016
Ref:
EUR 45/4936/2016
  • News
  • South Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

South Africa: Four years after Marikana killings, Lonmin fails to improve ‘appalling’ housing for thousands of workers

NOTE: Journalists and editors seeking broadcast-quality B-roll and images from the investigation on Marikana's poor housing issue, please click here http://goo. gl/S7cE9T   British platinum mining giant Lonmin Plc is still failing to deliver adequate housing for its workforce in Marikana, in spite of the resounding wake-up call it received in the wake of the killing of 34 striking mine workers in 2012, Amnesty International revealed today in a new report.

Date:
15 August 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Armed Conflict

UK: Amnesty International's Response to Chilcot Report on Iraq war

In response to today’s publication of the Iraq Inquiry, Sir John Chilcot’s much-awaited report on the UK’s involvement in the 2003 Iraq war, Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International said: “In the lead-up to the invasion, Amnesty International urged that the potentially grave consequences of military action be carefully assessed. And on the eve of the US-led invasion we urged full respect for international human rights law and international humanitarian law.

Date:
6 July 2016
  • Research
  • United Kingdom
  • Justice Systems

United Kingdom: Submission to the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (2016)

This briefing to the 58th session of the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights sets out Amnesty International's key concerns on the United Kingdom's compliance with the International Covenant on Social Economic and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). The briefing focuses on plans by the government to repeal the Human Rights Act 1998 and replace it with a British Bill of Rights; the criminalization of abortion and lack of access to abortion in Northern Ireland; and the impact of cuts to civil legal aid on access to justice and the right to an effective remedy.

Date:
24 May 2016
Ref:
EUR 45/3990/2016
  • News
  • Germany
  • Refugees

Refugees Welcome Index shows government refugee policies out of touch with public opinion

China, Germany, UK top index measuring public acceptance of refugees; Russia bottom Globally, 1 in 10 would let refugees stay in their home, 3 in 10 in their neighbourhood Call on World Humanitarian Summit to back “Global Compact” for helping refugees The vast majority of people (80%) would welcome refugees with open arms, with many even prepared to take them into their own homes, according to a global survey commissioned by Amnesty International.

Date:
19 May 2016