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EU: Orwellian counter-terrorism laws stripping rights under guise of defending them

Sweeping new laws are driving Europe into a deep and dangerous state of permanent securitization, Amnesty International said on the publication of a comprehensive human rights analysis of counter-terrorism measures across 14 EU member states. Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe reveals how a deluge of laws and amendments passed with break-neck speed, is undermining fundamental freedoms and dismantling hard-won human rights protections.

Date:
17 January 2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe - Executive Summary

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in a spate of violent attacks in European Union (EU) states between January 2015 and December 2016. They were shot by armed men, blown up in suicide bomb attacks and deliberately run over as they walked in the street. These callous crimes did not just target individuals; they were also attacks on societies, on how people live and what people think. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5343/2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in violent attacks in the European Union in 2015 and 2016. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent. This report gives a bird’s eye view of the national security landscape and shows just how widespread and deep the “securitization” of Europe has become. It focuses on eight themes: states of emergency, principle of legality, right to privacy, freedom of expression, right to liberty, freedom of movement, stripping of nationality, and the prohibition on sending people to places where they risk torture.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5342/2017
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

France: Renewal of State of Emergency risks normalizing exceptional measures

The French parliament’s adoption of a new law on December 15, 2016 to prolong the country’s state of emergency for an additional seven months risks normalizing exceptional measures while weakening human rights and the rule of law, Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International said today. At the end of this latest extension, France would have spent 20 months under the state of emergency. “With each renewal, the state of emergency slowly becomes the new norm, which is dangerous for a democracy based on rule of law,” said Nadim Houry, director of the terrorism and counterterrorism program at Human Rights Watch.

Date:
15 December 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

The courage to end France’s state of emergency

The state of emergency in France has already been renewed four times in the past year. During that time, people have been placed under house arrest, held for questioning, banned from attending demonstrations, had their homes raided, all without access to legal redress. During that time, a rhetoric of fear has dominated the public debate, stifling either questions or criticism. French politicians have wholeheartedly endorsed the normalization of such exceptional arrangements.

Date:
14 December 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Refugees

Squabbling over children in Calais sends an appalling message to the rest of the world

Over recent days, the relationship between the French and UK governments has been strained by renewed disagreement over who should take responsibility for children at Calais. The two governments have once more effectively abandoned these children in conditions which obviously put their safety and welfare at risk. This in contrast to the arrival in the UK of significant numbers of children over recent weeks, including many being reunited with family here – an outcome required by the Dublin III Regulations to which both countries are legally bound.

Date:
2 November 2016
  • News
  • Viet Nam
  • Killings and Disappearances

Viet Nam: President Hollande must back one woman’s fight for justice

President Francois Hollande of France must confront Vietnamese authorities over their treatment of one women’s fight for justice when he visits the country this week, Amnesty International said today. Amnesty International calls on the French president to raise in particular the case of Ngô Thanh Kiều, a young man who died in police custody in Phú Yên province in 2012. Since his death, his sister Ngô Thị Tuyết and her family have undertaken a brave crusade for justice in the face of physical attacks, death threats and other forms of intimidation.

Date:
6 September 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

France: Reaction to court decision to overturn burkini ban

Responding to the decision of France’s highest administrative court to overturn the ban on the burkini on a French beach, John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Europe Director said: “By overturning a discriminatory ban that is fuelled by and is fuelling prejudice and intolerance, today’s decision has drawn an important line in the sand. ” “French authorities must now drop the pretence that these measures do anything to protect the rights of women.

Date:
26 August 2016
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

France: Upholding burkini ban risks giving green light for abuse of women and girls

Failure to overturn the ban on the burkini would be a missed opportunity to end an assault on women’s freedoms of expression and religion as well as the right to non-discrimination, said Amnesty International as France’s highest administrative court considers a challenge to the ban. “The case being considered today offers an opportunity for the French justice system to overturn a discriminatory ban that is fuelled by and is fuelling prejudice and intolerance,” said John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Europe Director.

Date:
25 August 2016
  • News
  • France

Attack in Nice, France

Amnesty International utterly condemns the despicable attack in Nice last night, which has left over 80 dead and many more injured. No one has claimed responsibility for the attack, which President Hollande has described as being of a “terrorist nature”. Amnesty International’s Europe Director, John Dalhuisen said: “We are all deeply shocked by the appalling attack in Nice last night. We grieve with those who lost loved ones, and stand united with those opposing terror with freedom, fairness and the respect for human rights.

Date:
15 July 2016
  • Research
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

France: Submission to the UN Committee against Torture

Amnesty International submits this briefing to the United Nations (UN) Committee against Torture (the Committee) ahead of its examination, in April 2016, of France’s seventh periodic report (CAT/C/FRA/7) on the implementation of the UN Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (the Convention or the Convention against Torture). This written submission highlights Amnesty International’s concerns regarding forced evictions and violations of the prohibition of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment experienced by Romani adults and children at the hands of the French authorities, in violation of the provisions of Articles 2, 14 and 16 of the Convention.

Date:
23 March 2016
Ref:
EUR 21/3674/2016
  • News
  • France
  • Migrants

France: ‘Jungle’ camp demolitions and evictions must not bulldoze refugee rights

Today the French authorities started demolishing part of the ‘Jungle’ camp following Thursday’s court-awarded eviction order. Amid scenes of violence, up to 200 residents are currently affected, with further demolitions expected in the next few weeks until the camp is cleared. “As the demolition of the Calais ‘Jungle’ start, the French authorities must ensure that they don’t bulldoze through the rights of refugees and migrants, many of whom are likely to be extremely vulnerable,” said John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Europe and Central Asia Director.

Date:
29 February 2016