Turkmenistan

8 results

  • Research
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

Europe: First, do no harm: Ensuring the rights of children with variations of sex characteristics in Denmark and Germany

Every year, children are born with sex characteristics – genitals, gonads, hormones, chromosomes or reproductive organs – which vary from the established norms for ‘male’ and ‘female’. In this report, Amnesty International documents the specific human rights violations faced by children with variations of sex characteristics in Denmark and Germany, and the lifelong effect of these violations. The report focuses in particular on subjection to non-emergency invasive and irreversible surgeries and other medical treatments.

Date:
9 May 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/6086/2017
  • News
  • Denmark
  • LGBT Rights

Denmark and Germany: Authorities failing to protect intersex children from invasive surgery

Children born with sex characteristics that do not fit with female or male norms risk being subjected to a range of unnecessary, invasive and traumatizing medical procedures in violation of their human rights, said Amnesty International in a report launched today. Using case studies in Denmark and Germany, ‘First, Do No Harm’ shows how outdated gender stereotypes are resulting in non-emergency, invasive and irreversible surgical interventions on children who are intersex – the term commonly used for individuals with variations of sex characteristics such as chromosomes, genitals and reproductive organs.

Date:
9 May 2017
  • News
  • Denmark
  • LGBT Rights

Denmark takes key step towards destigmatizing transgender people

The Danish Parliament has ushered in a historic victory in the struggle for transgender rights by today adopting a decision to no longer stigmatize transgender identities as mental disorders, said Amnesty International. “This very encouraging move from Denmark sets a strong example internationally towards destigmatizing transgender people and paving the way for quick and transparent processes for legal gender recognition,” said Leda Avgousti, Amnesty International’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Advisor.

Date:
31 May 2016
  • News
  • Denmark
  • Discrimination

World must follow Denmark's example after landmark transgender law

A landmark law in Denmark making it easier for transgender people to change their legal gender should set an example to governments across the world, Amnesty International said. The Danish parliament yesterday passed a bill allowing transgender people to obtain official documents reflecting their gender identity without needing to be diagnosed with a mental disorder or undergo surgeries resulting in irreversible sterilization.

Date:
12 June 2014
  • Campaigns
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

A tale of two identities

Josh Bryan is an American living in Copenhagen, where he helped to launch a recent Amnesty International report on discrimination against transgender people in the European Union. He describes how strict Danish legislation has left him trapped in a system that doesn’t recognize his true identity while demanding that he surgically change his body. My story is about being stuck in two legal identities. I live in Denmark, a country that prides itself on its liberalism and welfare for its citizens.

Date:
10 February 2014
  • Research
  • Belgium
  • Children

Europe: The state decides who I am: Lack of legal gender recognition for transgender people in Europe

For transgender people, official identity documents reflecting their gender identity are vitally important for the enjoyment of their human rights. They are not only crucial when travelling but also for everyday life. This report illustrates the human rights violations experienced by transgender people in Europe when seeking legal gender recognition. Some countries simply do not allow for a change in one’s legal gender.

Date:
4 February 2014
Ref:
EUR 01/001/2014
  • Research
  • Azerbaijan
  • Discrimination

Suggested recommendations to States considered in the 16th round of the Universal Periodic Review, 22 April – 3 May 2013

In this document Amnesty International makes recommendations to the governments of different states about ratification of international human rights standards, domestic legislation and human rights violations. The abuses considered include death penalty; unfair trials; torture; impunity; restriction of freedoms of expression, association, religion and assembly; female genital mutilation; prison conditions and gender discrimination.

Date:
1 March 2013
Ref:
IOR 41/003/2013