Turkmenistan

74 results

My filters

  • Research
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

Europe: First, do no harm: Ensuring the rights of children with variations of sex characteristics in Denmark and Germany

Every year, children are born with sex characteristics – genitals, gonads, hormones, chromosomes or reproductive organs – which vary from the established norms for ‘male’ and ‘female’. In this report, Amnesty International documents the specific human rights violations faced by children with variations of sex characteristics in Denmark and Germany, and the lifelong effect of these violations. The report focuses in particular on subjection to non-emergency invasive and irreversible surgeries and other medical treatments.

Date:
9 May 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/6086/2017
  • News
  • Denmark
  • LGBT Rights

Denmark and Germany: Authorities failing to protect intersex children from invasive surgery

Children born with sex characteristics that do not fit with female or male norms risk being subjected to a range of unnecessary, invasive and traumatizing medical procedures in violation of their human rights, said Amnesty International in a report launched today. Using case studies in Denmark and Germany, ‘First, Do No Harm’ shows how outdated gender stereotypes are resulting in non-emergency, invasive and irreversible surgical interventions on children who are intersex – the term commonly used for individuals with variations of sex characteristics such as chromosomes, genitals and reproductive organs.

Date:
9 May 2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe - Executive Summary

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in a spate of violent attacks in European Union (EU) states between January 2015 and December 2016. They were shot by armed men, blown up in suicide bomb attacks and deliberately run over as they walked in the street. These callous crimes did not just target individuals; they were also attacks on societies, on how people live and what people think. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5343/2017
  • Research
  • Austria
  • EU

Europe: Dangerously disproportionate: The ever-expanding national security state in Europe

Hundreds of people were killed and wounded in violent attacks in the European Union in 2015 and 2016. The need to protect people from such wanton violence is obvious and urgent. This report gives a bird’s eye view of the national security landscape and shows just how widespread and deep the “securitization” of Europe has become. It focuses on eight themes: states of emergency, principle of legality, right to privacy, freedom of expression, right to liberty, freedom of movement, stripping of nationality, and the prohibition on sending people to places where they risk torture.

Date:
17 January 2017
Ref:
EUR 01/5342/2017
  • News
  • Denmark
  • LGBT Rights

Denmark takes key step towards destigmatizing transgender people

The Danish Parliament has ushered in a historic victory in the struggle for transgender rights by today adopting a decision to no longer stigmatize transgender identities as mental disorders, said Amnesty International. “This very encouraging move from Denmark sets a strong example internationally towards destigmatizing transgender people and paving the way for quick and transparent processes for legal gender recognition,” said Leda Avgousti, Amnesty International’s Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Advisor.

Date:
31 May 2016
  • News
  • Denmark
  • Refugees

Denmark: Parliament should reject cruel and regressive changes to refugee law

Proposed changes to Denmark’s refugee law would have a devastating impact on vulnerable people who, in addition to having assets seized, would be forced to wait years for the chance to reunite with their family members trapped in warzones and refugee camps, said Amnesty International today. The Danish Parliament is set to debate Thursday, ahead of a vote Tuesday, on proposed amendments to the Aliens Act, including one that would make “war refugees” wait for three years before being eligible to apply for family reunification.

Date:
21 January 2016
  • Research
  • Estonia
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Suggested recommendations to States considered in the 24th round of the Universal Periodic Review, 18-29 January 2016

This document contains Amnesty International's suggested recommendations for the 14 states – Belgium, Denmark, Estonia, Latvia, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Palau, Paraguay, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Solomon Islands and Somalia - that are coming up for review in the UPR Working Group session commencing 18 January 2016 aimed at addressing human rights challenges and improving respect for human rights in the states under review.

Date:
8 December 2015
Ref:
IOR 40/3034/2015
  • Research
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Asylum

Denmark: Human rights in review: 2011-2015 - Amnesty International Submission to the UN Universal Periodic Review, January - February 2016

This submission was prepared for the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Denmark taking place in January-February 2016. In it, Amnesty International evaluates the implementation of recommendations accepted by Denmark in its previous UPR, assesses the national human rights framework in Denmark and the Faroe Islands and the situation of human rights on the ground, and makes a number of recommendations to the Danish and the Faroese authorities to strengthen human rights protection and address human rights challenges at the national level.

Date:
9 September 2015
Ref:
EUR 18/2332/2015
  • Education
  • Denmark
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Stop Torture: The Diaries of a Young Activist

How the world’s youth are stepping up against torture: A group of young people from 17 different countries have been united behind one common goal: their fight to end torture. Marie-Louise, 22, tells us what it was like to work with 17 other young international activists as part of our Stop Torture campaign. Marie-Louise’s work as a human rights youth activist with Amnesty International Denmark began four years ago after participating in a meeting organised at her school.

Date:
26 June 2015
  • News
  • Denmark
  • Discrimination

World must follow Denmark's example after landmark transgender law

A landmark law in Denmark making it easier for transgender people to change their legal gender should set an example to governments across the world, Amnesty International said. The Danish parliament yesterday passed a bill allowing transgender people to obtain official documents reflecting their gender identity without needing to be diagnosed with a mental disorder or undergo surgeries resulting in irreversible sterilization.

Date:
12 June 2014
  • Campaigns
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Discrimination

A tale of two identities

Josh Bryan is an American living in Copenhagen, where he helped to launch a recent Amnesty International report on discrimination against transgender people in the European Union. He describes how strict Danish legislation has left him trapped in a system that doesn’t recognize his true identity while demanding that he surgically change his body. My story is about being stuck in two legal identities. I live in Denmark, a country that prides itself on its liberalism and welfare for its citizens.

Date:
10 February 2014
  • Research
  • Belgium
  • Children

Europe: The state decides who I am: Lack of legal gender recognition for transgender people in Europe

For transgender people, official identity documents reflecting their gender identity are vitally important for the enjoyment of their human rights. They are not only crucial when travelling but also for everyday life. This report illustrates the human rights violations experienced by transgender people in Europe when seeking legal gender recognition. Some countries simply do not allow for a change in one’s legal gender.

Date:
4 February 2014
Ref:
EUR 01/001/2014
  • Research
  • Denmark
  • Armed Conflict

Somalia: Mogadishu cannot qualify as an internal flight alternative

Denmark is now attempting to argue that Mogadishu can be used as an internal flight alternative; that is, that Somalis not from the city can be safely returned to Mogadishu. In this briefing, Amnesty International expresses concern that it is neither appropriate nor reasonable to regard Mogadishu as an internal flight alternative, and concludes that arguing this case is both dangerous and irresponsible.

Date:
26 September 2013
Ref:
AFR 52/012/2013
  • News
  • Denmark
  • Armed Conflict

Denmark: No forced returns to ‘volatile’ situation in Somalia

Forcibly returning people to a volatile security situation in Somalia would violate international law, Amnesty International said as the Danish Refugee Board is due to consider returning five Somali asylum seekers. The Danish hearings on Thursday and Friday come after at least two other European states – Norway and the Netherlands – have already ended suspensions on forcibly returning people to the Somali capital Mogadishu.

Date:
15 May 2013