Turkmenistan

539 results

My filters

  • Blog
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Why Sri Lanka's past refuses to be forgotten

It is difficult to imagine anything more traumatic than the sudden disappearance of a loved one. The scramble for any facts that can be established with any clarity. The yearning to know, the pain of imagining. The flame of hope that subsides to a barely perceptible flicker, never quite extinguished by the passage of time. There can be no real certainty, no closure, no moving on. Sithy Ameena, Sandya Ekneligoda and Vathana Suntharajaj all share this sense of perpetual grief.

Date:
3 April 2017
  • News
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka - Victims of disappearance cannot wait any longer for justice

Sri Lanka will not break with its violent past until it reckons with the cruel history of enforced disappearance and delivers justice to as many as 100,000 families who have spent years waiting for it, Amnesty International said today in a new report, revealing the enduring scars of a conflict that has been forgotten by the world. Amnesty International’s report, “Only Justice can heal our wounds”, will be launched by the organization’s Secretary General Salil Shetty at a meeting with families of the disappeared in the northern Sri Lankan town of Mannar.

Date:
3 April 2017
  • Research
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka: "Only justice can heal our wounds": Listening to the demands of families of the disappeared in Sri Lanka

In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability.

Date:
1 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 37/5853/2017
  • News
  • Afghanistan
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

It has become dangerous to be a blogger or a journalist in South Asia

For all the differences South Asia’s countries insist on, they have depressingly similar attitudes when it comes to human rights. Over the past year, as Amnesty International documents in its Annual Report, civil society organisations have been harassed and shut down, journalists have been targeted, crude colonial-era laws have been unleashed against government critics, new laws have been invoked against critics online, and brutal practices have endured in areas afflicted by conflict.

Date:
1 March 2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Human rights violations endemic in South Asia

For all the differences South Asia's countries insist on, they have depressingly similar attitudes when it comes to human rights. Over the past year, as Amnesty International documents in its Annual Report, civil society organisations have been harassed and shut down, journalists have been targeted, crude colonial-era laws have been unleashed against government critics, new laws have been invoked against critics online, and brutal practices have endured in areas afflicted by conflict.

Date:
28 February 2017
  • Research
  • Sri Lanka
  • Impunity

Sri Lanka: Victims demand truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence: Written statement to the 34th session of the UN Human Rights Council

Sri Lanka committed with Resolution 30/1 to undertake a comprehensive approach to dealing with the past, including ensuring truth, justice, reparation and non-recurrence for human rights violations and abuses. This is an important step towards acknowledging the traumatic experiences of many thousands of victims over decades of armed conflict and insurgency, and accepting its obligations to provide them with effective remedies.

Date:
10 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 37/5677/2017
  • Research
  • Sri Lanka
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka: Refusing to disappear: Tens of thousands missing: families demand answers

Enforced disappearance has touched every community, and within Sri Lanka there has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. With a backlog of between 60,000 and 100,000 alleged enforced disappearances since the late 1980s, there is no shortage of examples of frustrated justice. And yet, family members of the disappeared continue to demand accountability. Their experiences illustrate the impact of these crimes and demonstrate the burden placed on those - particularly women - seeking accountability and the lengths to which some families have gone to get attention to their demands.

Date:
23 January 2017
Ref:
ASA 37/5497/2017
  • News
  • Sri Lanka
  • Killings and Disappearances

Sri Lanka: Amnesty International hosts “Memory and Justice” – day of activities and poetry book launch

Amnesty International will be hosting a day of activities around the theme of “Memory and Justice” in Colombo on 24 January 2016 at the Sri Lanka Foundation Institute. The day of activities will be a platform for a series of workshops and art exhibits. Amnesty International will also be launching Silenced Shadows, the published collection of winning entries from the human rights organization’s October 2015 poetry competition on the theme of enforced disappearances.

Date:
21 January 2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Armed Conflict

Sri Lanka: Consultation Task Force report must lead to justice

As long as the Sri Lankan government ignores the findings of a taskforce, which examines crimes under international law and human rights violations and abuses during the country’s decades-long internal conflict, justice, truth and reparation for thousands of families who have suffered deaths and disappearances will remain elusive, Amnesty International said today. The organization is dismayed by the Sri Lankan government’s casual disregard for the findings compiled by the Consultation Task Force on Reconciliation Mechanisms (CTF).

Date:
11 January 2017
  • Research
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar - New name, old system? Qatar's new employment law and abuse of migrant workers

Qatar has been under intense international scrutiny for its treatment of migrant workers since being awarded the rights to host the 2022 World Cup. Particular focus has been placed on the notorious 2009 sponsorship law, which ties workers to their employers, putting them at risk of forced labour. In December 2016, this law is being replaced. This briefing examines whether its replacement, Law No. 21 of 2015, will make any significant improvement to the lives of workers in the country.

Date:
12 December 2016
Ref:
MDE 22/5242/2016
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka: Making the rights choices

When Sri Lanka co-sponsored UN Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 in October 2015, the authorities finally acknowledged the need to end the long cycle of violence and impunity for violations of human rights. A year later, the government continues to commit to deliver justice, truth, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. However, valid concerns have also been expressed by Sri Lankan civil society groups and victims regarding the pace of progress.

Date:
8 November 2016
Ref:
ASA 37/4902/2016
  • Research
  • Sri Lanka
  • UN

Amnesty International’s written statement to the 33rd session of the UN Human Rights Council (13 – 30 September 2016)

In 2015, Sri Lanka co-sponsored Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 Promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka. There have been positive developments since then, including increased openness to engage with Special Procedures. However, slow progress in delivering on many aspects of the ambitious agenda coupled with lack of transparency has led some victims and human rights defenders to express frustration.

Date:
31 August 2016
Ref:
ASA 37/4721/2016
  • News
  • Indonesia
  • Refugees

Indonesia: Allow stranded Sri Lankan Tamil asylum seekers to disembark

The Indonesian central government should allow dozens of Sri Lankan Tamil asylum seekers, including a pregnant woman and nine children, who have reached the coast of Lhoknga, Aceh, to disembark and meet UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) officials, Amnesty International said today. “These people have endured a long and difficult journey already. Now that they have reached land in Aceh, they should be allowed to disembark and meet UNHCR officials,” said Josef Benedict, Amnesty International’s Director of Campaigns for South East Asia and the Pacific.

Date:
15 June 2016