Turkmenistan

3,010 results

  • News
  • Vatican
  • Refugees

Vatican: President Trump should heed Pope Francis’ call to “build bridges, not walls”

Ahead of the meeting between Pope Francis and President Trump in the Vatican tomorrow, John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Director for Europe said: “Pope Francis has spoken forcefully in favour of freedom and justice and need to build bridges rather than walls. President Trump would do well to heed this advice. ” “The Pope has also warned against the rise of populism and the importance of opening our hearts and borders to refugees fleeing war and conflict.

Date:
23 May 2017
  • News
  • United States of America
  • Women and Girls

USA Health of pregnant women being jeopardized by punitive laws

A set of US laws which claim to promote maternal and infant health are in fact driving pregnant women away from vital health services, jeopardizing their wellbeing and violating their right to health, according to a new report published by Amnesty International today. Criminalizing Pregnancy: Policing Pregnant Women Who Use Drugs in the USA, highlights the impact of pregnancy criminalization laws, especially those which are used to arrest and prosecute women who use drugs based on a belief that they are harming their fetuses.

Date:
23 May 2017
  • Research
  • United States of America
  • Women and Girls

USA: Criminalizing pregnancy: policing pregnant women who use drugs in the USA

In the USA, pregnant women lie at the center of a contested battleground over their sexual and reproductive rights. A series of laws police the behavior of pregnant women and particularly impact those who are marginalized and those who use drugs. Collectively called pregnancy criminalization laws, this report provides a basic overview of the impact of these laws on women’s human rights and access to healthcare across the USA, and specifically focuses on two criminal laws in Alabama and Tennessee.

Date:
23 May 2017
Ref:
AMR 51/6203/2017
  • Research
  • United States of America
  • Discrimination

USA: "My family was in shock" - The harm caused by President Trump's executive orders on travel to the US

US President Donald Trump had been in office for exactly a week when he issued an executive order barring the entry of people from seven Muslim-majority countries and slamming the door on refugees. Besides documenting the harms caused by the first executive order during the relatively brief period in which it was in effect, this briefing paper describes the situations of people who are still awaiting US visas, some of whom could be irreparably harmed if the US courts were to rule that the second executive order is constitutional.

Date:
12 May 2017
Ref:
AMR 51/6207/2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Discrimination

USA: Return to bigoted anti-Muslim travel ban would cause immeasurable harm

The Trump administration’s executive order on travel, scheduled for federal appeals court review on Monday, would harm both immigrants and US citizens if allowed to enter into effect, warns Amnesty International in a briefing paper released today. “President Trump’s travel ban order separated families and sent a message of bigotry and intolerance,” said Joanne Mariner, Senior Crisis Response Adviser at Amnesty International.

Date:
12 May 2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

USA: 100 ways Trump has threatened human rights in first 100 days

As the first 100 days of President Donald Trump’s administration come to a close, Amnesty International has compiled a list of 100 ways the Trump administration has tried to threaten human rights in the USA and around the world – sometimes succeeding, and sometimes being blocked by a powerful and growing resistance movement. “These first 100 days show how dangerous Trump’s agenda is, and they’re also a roadmap for how to stop it and protect human rights in the USA and around the world,” said Margaret Huang, executive director of Amnesty International USA.

Date:
25 April 2017
  • News
  • Canada
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Alicia Keys and the Indigenous rights movement in Canada honoured with top Amnesty International award

Celebrated global music artist and activist Alicia Keys and the inspirational movement of Indigenous Peoples fighting for their rights in Canada have been honoured with Amnesty International’s Ambassador of Conscience Award for 2017, the human rights organization announced today. The award will be officially presented at a ceremony in Montréal, Canada, on May 27. Accepting the award recognizing the Indigenous rights movement of Canada will be six individuals representing the strength and diversity of the movement, which has bravely fought to end discrimination and ensure the safety and well-being of Indigenous families and communities.

Date:
13 April 2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Refugees

How to stir up a refugee crisis in five steps, Trump style

The sight of one of the most infamous borders on earth – roughly 1,000 kilometers of porous metal fencedividing lives, hopes and dreams between the USA and Mexico, is undoubtedly overwhelming, but not in the way we expected it to be. While it has been one of the most talked about issues since last year’s USA election campaign, the stretch of land that separates the USA and Mexico now lies eerily quiet.

Date:
28 March 2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Discrimination

Myanmar: Fact-finding mission welcome, urgently needed, overdue

An internationally mandated fact-finding mission to look at human rights violations in Myanmar is welcome, urgently needed and long overdue, Amnesty International said today. “The announcement of an independent international fact-finding mission to look into human rights violations in Myanmar is long overdue. After the Myanmar government’s failure to establish a credible investigation into the security forces’ crimes against the Rohingya in northern Rakhine State, there is an urgent need for a team of international experts examine alleged violations there, in Kachin and in northern Shan State,” said Champa Patel, Amnesty International’s Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

Date:
24 March 2017
  • News
  • Myanmar
  • Killings and Disappearances

Myanmar: Act now on Rakhine Commission report

Myanmar’s authorities must immediately act on the urgent calls made in an interim report by the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State, Amnesty International said today. “The authorities must immediately act on the Rakhine Commission’s recommendations to grant humanitarian access, end the media blackout in northern Rakhine State, and ensure the perpetrators of human rights violations are held accountable,” said Champa Patel, Amnesty International’s Director for Southeast Asia and the Pacific.

Date:
17 March 2017
  • News
  • Europe and Central Asia
  • Refugees

A remarkable journey: An emotional reunion

“When I close my eyes, all I see is being with my father again,” Alan Mohamed told me when I met him for the first time in a refugee camp near Athens last July. He and his sister Gyan,who have both suffered from muscular dystrophy since birth, thought that moment might never come. But, on Thursday night in Hanover, Germany, against all the odds and after a journey that saw them cross four borders and spend the past year stranded in Greece, their family was finally reunited.

Date:
17 March 2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Discrimination

USA: Hawaii Ruling Affirms Discriminatory Nature of Trump Refugee Order

Following a ruling by a federal judge in Hawaii blocking President Trump’s revised Muslim ban, Margaret Huang, executive director at Amnesty International USA had the following reaction: “As long as this hateful policy remains, it will continue to be fought in courts while thousands of people and families are trapped in uncertainty. Congress can end this by passing legislation that effectively nullifies the ban.

Date:
15 March 2017
  • News
  • Americas
  • Children

USA: Baby left stranded a world away from her family amid Trump’s chaotic Muslim ban

It was an excruciating choice that no family should ever have to make. Should they stay together with their two young daughters and miss perhaps their only chance to escape the horrors of war, or should they make a break for freedom but leave their year-old baby behind in a foreign land half-way around the world? This was the devil’s dilemma facing US-Yemeni dual national Baraa Ahmed (not his real name) and his wife, who were separated from their breastfeeding baby in the wake of President Trump’s discriminatory travel ban.

Date:
8 March 2017