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Nepal: Respect human rights during elections

Ahead of the second round of Nepal’s historic local elections tomorrow, Amnesty International calls on the country’s authorities to respect people’s human rights. Voting is due to take place in areas where Amnesty International has documented serious human rights violations, particularly at the hands of the security forces, including the unlawful use of excessive and lethal force, torture and other ill-treatment, and arbitrary detention.

Date:
27 June 2017
  • Blog
  • Nepal
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Exploitation of Nepali migrant workers: Bharat's Story

This is the final blog in a three-part series which shines light on some of the realities faced by Nepali migrant workers throughout the three stages of the migration process: their recruitment; time in-country; and their return home. You can read the first blog here and the second blog here. This last blog tells the story of “Bharat” who was stranded in Malaysia and then abandoned by his recruitment agency and government, and was forced to seek out a black market agent who charged extremely high fees, just to get home.

Date:
20 June 2017
  • Blog
  • Nepal
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Exploitation of Nepali migrant worker: Madhu's Story

This is the second in a three-part series which shines light on some of the realities faced by Nepali migrant workers throughout the three stages of the migration process: their recruitment; time in-country; and their return home. You can read the first blog here. “Madhu” went to Saudi Arabia to work in a beauty parlour, but was instead involuntarily confined to her employer’s house for more than two years.

Date:
13 June 2017
  • News
  • Nepal
  • Migrants

Nepal: Unscrupulous recruiters given free rein to exploit migrants

The Nepali government is failing to address rampant deception and extortion in the country’s labour recruitment business, putting migrant workers at risk of forced labour abroad and leaving them with crippling debts, according to a report published today by Amnesty International. “All over Nepal, unscrupulous recruiters are getting away with destroying lives – illegally charging aspiring job-seekers exorbitant fees to get jobs abroad, and then abandoning them overseas when things go wrong,” said James Lynch, Deputy Director of Amnesty International’s Global Issues programme.

Date:
6 June 2017
  • Research
  • Nepal
  • Migrants

Nepal: Turning people into profits: Abusive recruitment, trafficking and forced labour of Nepali migrant workers

This report provides fresh evidence that despite recently-introduced government reforms, entrenched patterns of abuse of Nepali migrant workers remain unaddressed. During recruitment processes, local agents and recruitment agents in Nepal are still able to deceive and exploit migrants without significant fear of being caught or punished. New government policies meant to improve the protection of migrant workers’ rights, and drastically reduce what recruitment businesses can charge workers, have not been adequately resourced, monitored, or enforced.

Date:
6 June 2017
Ref:
ASA 31/6206/2017
  • Blog
  • Nepal
  • Business and Human Rights

Exploitation of Nepali migrant workers: Aadinath’s story

This is the first blog in a series showing light on some of the stark realities faced by Nepali migrant workers. This is the story of “Aadinath”, who accumulated a staggering debt – the equivalent of over two years of his annual income – before he had even left Nepal due to fees he had to pay a recruitment agency. This crippling indebtedness left him with no choice but to enter into exploitative working conditions.

Date:
5 June 2017
  • Research
  • Nepal
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

"What I want is for the government to help". Nepal: Ensure the right to adequate housing for the marginalised in post-earthquake Nepal.

On 25 April 2015 a massive earthquake hit Nepal, followed by another on 12 May. Two years on, hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors are still living in temporary shelters made primarily of tarpaulin and zinc sheets. The worst affected are disadvantaged groups, including landless people, who are not eligible for government reconstruction assistance. Earthquake survivors from disadvantaged groups generously shared their stories of hardship with Amnesty International.

Date:
25 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 31/5957/2017
  • News
  • Nepal
  • Slums and the Right to Housing

Nepal: Two years on, the government continues to fail marginalised earthquake survivors

Two years today after a large earthquake shook Nepal, destroying more than half a million homes and damaging a quarter million more, the government is failing marginalised earthquake survivors, breaching both the Constitution and international human rights law, Amnesty International said today in a new report. Lashed by rains through two monsoon seasons, and left shivering in the cold during two winters, delays and the way reconstruction efforts are being rolled out has forced thousands of earthquake survivors to languish in temporary shelters predominantly made of zinc sheets and tarpaulin, the promise of their homes being rebuilt broken.

Date:
25 April 2017
  • Research
  • Nepal
  • Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Nepal: "Building Inequality" - The failure of the Nepali government to protect the marginalised in post-earthquake reconstruction efforts

On 25 April 2015, a massive earthquake hit Nepal, followed by another on 12 May. Two years on, hundreds of thousands of earthquake survivors are still living in temporary shelters made primarily of tarpaulin and zinc sheets. The reconstruction model adopted by the Government of Nepal emphasises an “owner-driven” approach, which requires proof of land ownership as a condition to qualify for a rebuilding grant scheme.

Date:
25 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 31/6071/2017
  • News
  • Nepal
  • Armed Groups

Nepal: Need Effective Steps to Enforce Court Verdicts

Rule of Law Should Prevail, Not Political Protectionism Nepali authorities should immediately take effective steps to enforce the landmark Kavre district court murder verdict for the 2004 torture and killing of teenage Maina Sunuwar, Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the International Commission of Jurists said today. On 16 April 2017, the Kavre district court sentenced three army officers to life imprisonment for the murder of Maina Sunuwar, a 15-year-old girl who was tortured in army custody and died as a result in February 2004.

Date:
20 April 2017
  • News
  • Nepal
  • Killings and Disappearances

Nepal: Investigation urgently needed after security forces shoot protesters dead

Nepal’s authorities must promptly investigate the security forces who opened fire on a crowd of protestors in Saptari district in the Tarai, Nepal’s southern plains, killing three people and injuring 16, Amnesty International said today. “This was an unlawful use of lethal force. There must be a prompt, effective and impartial investigation, and those responsible must be held accountable,” said Aura Freeman, Amnesty International’s Nepal campaigner.

Date:
7 March 2017
  • News
  • Afghanistan
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

It has become dangerous to be a blogger or a journalist in South Asia

For all the differences South Asia’s countries insist on, they have depressingly similar attitudes when it comes to human rights. Over the past year, as Amnesty International documents in its Annual Report, civil society organisations have been harassed and shut down, journalists have been targeted, crude colonial-era laws have been unleashed against government critics, new laws have been invoked against critics online, and brutal practices have endured in areas afflicted by conflict.

Date:
1 March 2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Human rights violations endemic in South Asia

For all the differences South Asia's countries insist on, they have depressingly similar attitudes when it comes to human rights. Over the past year, as Amnesty International documents in its Annual Report, civil society organisations have been harassed and shut down, journalists have been targeted, crude colonial-era laws have been unleashed against government critics, new laws have been invoked against critics online, and brutal practices have endured in areas afflicted by conflict.

Date:
28 February 2017
  • Research
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar - New name, old system? Qatar's new employment law and abuse of migrant workers

Qatar has been under intense international scrutiny for its treatment of migrant workers since being awarded the rights to host the 2022 World Cup. Particular focus has been placed on the notorious 2009 sponsorship law, which ties workers to their employers, putting them at risk of forced labour. In December 2016, this law is being replaced. This briefing examines whether its replacement, Law No. 21 of 2015, will make any significant improvement to the lives of workers in the country.

Date:
12 December 2016
Ref:
MDE 22/5242/2016