Turkmenistan

51 results

  • News
  • Indonesia
  • Business and Human Rights

Indonesia: Palm oil workers must get justice

As the world marks International Workers’ Day, Amnesty International calls on the Indonesian government to fulfil its commitment to establish a Task Force to investigate abuses against workers in the country’s vast palm-oil industry. An Amnesty International report revealed labour exploitation on Indonesian plantations owned by suppliers and subsidiaries of Wilmar International, the world’s largest palm oil trader.

Date:
1 May 2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Business and Human Rights

Australia: Treasure I$land: How companies are profiting from Australia's abuse of refugees on Nauru

Under the Government of Australia’s “offshore processing" regime, everyone who arrives in Australia by boat seeking asylum is forcibly taken to a "Refugee Processing Centre" on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea or the Pacific island of Nauru. This briefing exposes how companies Broadspectrum and Ferrovial are complicit in and reaping vast profits from the abusive and secretive system on Nauru, acting contrary to their responsibility to respect human rights and exposing themselves to potential liability under civil and criminal law.

Date:
5 April 2017
Ref:
ASA 12/5942/2017
  • News
  • Myanmar
  • Business and Human Rights

Myanmar: Suspend copper mine linked to ongoing human rights abuses

The Myanmar authorities must immediately halt operations at a giant copper mine co-owned by a Chinese company and the Myanmar military, which continues to be plagued by human rights abuses, Amnesty International said today in a new report. The Letpadaung mine is operated by Wanbao Mining, a subsidiary of NORINCO, a Chinese state-owned conglomerate with interests in arms manufacturing and mining – and began shipping copper in September 2016.

Date:
10 February 2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Business and Human Rights

Myanmar: Mountain of trouble: Human rights abuses continue at Myanmar’s Letpadaung mine

This briefing examines the current human rights situation at Myanmar's largest copper mine, the Letpadaung mine. The operating company, a subsidiary of China’s Wanbao Mining, intends to extend the mine’s perimeter, putting hundreds of people at risk of forced eviction from their homes and farmland. The company has also failed to undertake an adequate environmental assessment of the mine, putting the safety of the neighbouring communities at risk.

Date:
10 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/5564/2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Business and Human Rights

Thailand must cease prosecution of human rights defenders

Thailand’s use of criminal defamation laws and the Computer Crimes Act to prosecute human rights defenders violates its international obligations and increases risk for businesses that source goods from Thailand. This joint Open Letter calls for reform, from a coalition of 110 civil society groups, worker organizations, businesses and members of the European Parliament sent to Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha on International Human Rights Day.

Date:
12 December 2016
Ref:
ASA 39/5333/2016
  • News
  • Myanmar
  • Business and Human Rights

Myanmar: Sulphuric acid factory behind health fears must be relocated

The Myanmar government must immediately order the relocation of a sulphuric acid factory built dangerously close to a village, which is continuing to operate despite grave concerns over its health and environmental impact, said Amnesty International today. Residents of Kankone village told Amnesty International on a recent research mission to Myanmar that they are suffering from strong-smelling factory emissions that are causing respiratory, skin and eye problems.

Date:
20 July 2016
  • Research
  • Myanmar
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Myanmar: UN support is still required to improve the human rights situation Amnesty International’s written statement to the 31st session of the UN Human Rights Council (29 February-24 March 2016)

The recent elections in Myanmar should not be seen as a sign that the UN Human Rights Council’s (Council/HRC) engagement is no longer needed in Myanmar. When it assumes power at the beginning of April 2016, Myanmar’s new government will be confronted with a wide range of human rights challenges, and it is unclear, at this stage, what capacity it will have to address them. The Council’s attention on the human rights situation in Myanmar is still necessary to ensure the new government receives the support it needs to fulfil its international human rights obligations and commitments.

Date:
15 February 2016
Ref:
ASA 16/3436/2016
  • Research
  • Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

Democratic Republic of Congo: "This is what we die for": Human rights abuses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo power the global trade in cobalt

This report documents the hazardous conditions in which artisanal miners, including thousands of children, mine cobalt in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It goes on to trace how this cobalt is used to power mobile phones, laptop computers, and other portable electronic devices. Using basic hand tools, miners dig out rocks from tunnels deep underground, and accidents are common. Despite the potentially fatal health effects of prolonged exposure to cobalt, adult and child miners work without even the most basic protective equipment.

Date:
19 January 2016
Ref:
AFR 62/3183/2016