Turkmenistan

135 results

  • Research
  • Myanmar
  • Armed Conflict

Myanmar: "All the civilians suffer" : Conflict, displacement, and abuse in Northern Myanmar

Over the last seven months, fighting has intensified between the Myanmar Army and ethnic armed groups in Kachin and northern Shan States, areas with long-running conflicts as ethnic minorities have sought greater autonomy and respect for their rights. This report documents war crimes and other human rights violations by the Myanmar Army, including extrajudicial executions, torture, forced labour, and indiscriminate shelling.

Date:
14 June 2017
Ref:
ASA 16/6429/2017
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Impunity

Tiananmen anniversary lays bare China’s contradictory attitude towards history

History. Few words are more important, or even sacred, to Chinese culture. China prides itself on having a rich history and illustrious culture that goes back 5,000 years. And yet, when it comes to the treatment of history, China’s ruling Communist Party suffers from a case of Orwellian “double think” – holding two mutually contradictory ideas at the same time without recognizing the contradiction. On the world stage, Chinese leaders boldly assert that history should be viewed objectively, and all parties should acknowledge past human rights violations, no matter how painful it may be to do so.

Date:
4 June 2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Philippines: Impending Arrest of Senator Politically Motivated

Amnesty International condemns the impending arrest of prominent human rights defender Senator Leila de Lima as politically motivated and is calling for all charges against her to be dropped immediately. The arrest of de Lima is a blatant attempt by the Philippine government to silence criticism of President Duterte and divert attention away from serious human rights violations in the “war on drugs. ”.

Date:
23 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 35/5772/2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Justice Systems

Indonesia: 28 years later, Talangsari victims are still being denied justice

On 7 February, as thousands of victims and victims’ families from Talangsari, Lampung mark the 28th anniversary of the serious human rights violations against them and are still demanding justice, Amnesty International is extremely concerned that the Indonesian government is attempting to resolve this and seven other cases solely through the establishment of a non-judicial mechanism. The organization calls on the Indonesia government to ensure that victims and their families receive truth, justice and reparation for the violations they have suffered.

Date:
7 February 2017
Ref:
ASA 21/5628/2017
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • UN

Indonesia: It's not good enough: Amnesty International submission for the UN Universal Periodic Review, 27th Session of the UPR Working Group, May 2017

Amnesty International is concerned about the failure by Indonesia to ensure truth, justice and reparations for the victims of past human rights violations and their relatives, and the fragile justice system in the country. Rather than listening to victims and their families, the authorities have attempted to silence public discussions in many areas of Indonesia and have disbanded events related to the mass human rights violations that occurred in 1965-66 and the use of unnecessary and excessive force, particularly in Papua.

Date:
14 December 2016
Ref:
ASA 21/5345/2016
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Fiji: Beating justice: How Fiji’s security forces get away with torture

In spite of Fiji’s recent commitments to uphold human rights, extrajudicial punishment is often meted out by the security forces – police and military officers – resulting in severe injuries and sometimes death. Suspected criminals or escaped prisoners are at high risk of torture and other ill-treatment in custody. Military involvement in civilian policing operations is unnecessary, undermines public confidence in the police and has led to serious human rights abuses.

Date:
4 December 2016
Ref:
ASA 18/5149/2016
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Disappearances

Sri Lanka: Making the rights choices

When Sri Lanka co-sponsored UN Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 in October 2015, the authorities finally acknowledged the need to end the long cycle of violence and impunity for violations of human rights. A year later, the government continues to commit to deliver justice, truth, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. However, valid concerns have also been expressed by Sri Lankan civil society groups and victims regarding the pace of progress.

Date:
8 November 2016
Ref:
ASA 37/4902/2016
  • Research
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Thailand: "Make Him Speak By Tomorrow": Torture and Other Ill-Treatment in Thailand

In Thailand, senior government officials have declared their commitment to ending the use of torture. Nevertheless, Amnesty International has found, through a two year investigation, that torture remains shockingly common. This report describes the findings of a two year investigation by Amnesty International into the use of torture and other ill treatment by Thai authorities. It identifies the legal and institutional failures that facilitate torture and other ill-treatment in Thailand and offers recommendations to such abuses once and for all.

Date:
28 September 2016
Ref:
ASA 39/4747/2016
  • Research
  • Thailand
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

Thailand: "Make him speak by tomorrow": Torture and other ill-treatment in Thailand: Executive Summary

In Thailand, senior government officials have declared their commitment to ending the use of torture. Nevertheless, Amnesty International has found, through a two year investigation, that torture remains shockingly common. The report “Make him Speak by Tomorrow" describes the findings of a two year investigation by Amnesty International into the use of torture and other ill treatment by Thai authorities.

Date:
28 September 2016
Ref:
ASA 39/4746/2016
  • News
  • Malaysia
  • Impunity

Malaysia: National Security Council Act gives authorities unchecked and abusive powers

The National Security Council Act that comes into force today empowers the Malaysian authorities to trample over human rights and act with impunity, Amnesty International said today. “With this new law, the government now has spurned checks and assumed potentially abusive powers,” said Josef Benedict, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for South East Asia and the Pacific. The new law will grant the Malaysian authorities the power to carry out warrantless arrests, search and seize property, and impose curfews at will.

Date:
1 August 2016