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India: Further Information: Children released from unlawful detention: Rayees Ahmad Mir and Waheed Ahmed Gojree

Rayees Ahmad Mir and Waheed Ahmed Gojree have been released after the Jammu and Kashmir High Court quashed their detention orders on 6 and 31 December 2016 respectively. The teenagers were unlawfully detained in prison under the Jammu and Kashmir Public Safety Act (PSA), an administrative detention law that expressly prohibits the detention of anyone under 18 years of age.

Date:
3 February 2017
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
ASA 20/5615/2017
  • Research
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar - New name, old system? Qatar's new employment law and abuse of migrant workers

Qatar has been under intense international scrutiny for its treatment of migrant workers since being awarded the rights to host the 2022 World Cup. Particular focus has been placed on the notorious 2009 sponsorship law, which ties workers to their employers, putting them at risk of forced labour. In December 2016, this law is being replaced. This briefing examines whether its replacement, Law No. 21 of 2015, will make any significant improvement to the lives of workers in the country.

Date:
12 December 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
MDE 22/5242/2016
  • Campaigns
  • India
  • Censorship and Free Speech

India: Further Information: Detained journalist beaten for protest: Santosh Yadav

Police in Chhattisgarh, a state in Central India, used batons to beat detained journalist Santosh Yadav and seven other prisoners for protesting against the quality of food served in the Jagdalpur central jail. Santosh Yadav’s relatives say they have not been allowed to see him since the incident.

Date:
10 November 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
ASA 20/5114/2016
  • Research
  • India
  • Detention

India: Impunity, discrimination and repression of dissent: Amnesty international submission for the UN Universal Periodic Review – 27th session of the UPR Working Group, April/May 2017

Amnesty International is concerned about the retention of laws in India which are not in line with international human rights law, including on children’s rights and the death penalty, and the use of legal provisions to restrict the right to freedom of expression. Discrimination and violence against women, girls, Dalit and Adivasi people, and members of religious minority groups remains a concern, as does harassment and attacks against human rights defenders and journalists.

Date:
30 September 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
ASA 20/5206/2016
  • News
  • India
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Human rights do not stand in the way of India’s ambitions

“Our democracy,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi warned soon after coming to office, “will not sustain if we can’t guarantee freedom of speech and expression. ” Importantly, it should be noted, that it is not just the freedom to voice conformist views – it is also the freedom to express views that are unpopular, critical, or even offensive. This is why the Indian constitution guarantees freedom of expression, and why it has signed up to a number of international human rights treaties.

Date:
20 August 2016
  • News
  • India
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

Space for civil society and dissent is shrinking: Amnesty International India Executive Director

This is a Q&A that the Hindustan Times conducted with Aakar Patel, Amnesty International India's Executive Director Police filed an FIR under various sections of the Indian Penal Code (IPC), including section 124A - sedition, against Amnesty International India on Monday for alleged raising of “anti-India” slogans at an event held by the organisation in Bengaluru. The alleged sloganeering at the event --- held to highlight human rights abuses in Jammu and Kashmir – earned the ire of right-wing students group Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP).

Date:
19 August 2016
  • News
  • India
  • Prisoners of Conscience

India: End of Irom Sharmila’s hunger strike an opportunity to repeal AFSPA

Amnesty International Prisoner of Conscience Irom Chanu Sharmila ended her 16-year-long hunger strike against the Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act (AFSPA) today. Amnesty International India calls on authorities to drop all charges against her, and take steps to repeal the AFSPA. At a hearing in a local court, Irom Sharmila said, “I have been fasting for the last 16 years. I haven’t got anything from it yet.

Date:
9 August 2016
  • Research
  • India
  • Discrimination

India: “When land is lost, do we eat coal?” Coal mining and violations of Adivasi rights in India

Coal is an important part of India’s economic growth story. However coal mining in India also has a different cost, borne by the communities affected by these mines, who are rarely meaningfully informed or consulted when their land is acquired, their forests decimated, and their livelihoods jeopardised. This report examines how land acquisition and mining in three mines in three different states run by three different Coal India Limited subsidiaries have breached Indian domestic laws, and India’s obligations under international human rights law.

Date:
13 July 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
ASA 20/4391/2016
  • Research
  • India
  • Discrimination

India: “When land is lost, do we eat coal?” Coal mining and violations of Adivasi rights in India: Executive summary

This is the summary of the Amnesty International report which considers the human cost of increased coal production in India. The issues reported are indicative of a broader pattern of violations of Adivasi communities’ rights to consultation and consent. The consequences of these failures are felt most keenly by some of India’s most vulnerable people, who already live in poverty. Without respect for the rights of all people, India’s development goals will never truly be met.

Date:
13 July 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
ASA 20/4392/2016
  • News
  • India
  • Discrimination

Strength in Numbers: Sex Worker Collectives in India

Bharati Dey, 52 years old, from Kolkata, India, is a former sex worker and now heads the Durbar Mahila Samanwaya Committee (Durbar). This collective of 75,000 sex workers from across the West Bengal region was founded in 1995 and is managed by sex workers and their children. Durbar, which means ‘unstoppable’ in Bengali, aims to strengthen sex workers’ rights through solidarity and reduce the stigma and discrimination they face.

Date:
27 May 2016
  • Research
  • Qatar
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar: Executive Summary: The Ugly Side of the Beautiful Game: Exploitation of migrant workers on a Qatar 2022 World Cup site

Migrant workers on Khalifa International Stadium and the surrounding Aspire Zone, one of the main venues for the 2022 World Cup, have been subjected to a range of exploitative practices. This is the summary of the Amnesty International report which details these human rights violations.

Date:
31 March 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
MDE 22/3741/2016
  • Research
  • Qatar
  • Business and Human Rights

Qatar: Letters of response - The Ugly Side of the Beautiful Game: Exploitation of Migrant Workers on a Qatar 2022 World Cup site

All correspondences from the Qatar government, organisations and companies in relation to the abuse of migrant workers on·Khalifa International Stadium and Aspire Zone. Some of the names of organisations and selected attachments listing individuals have been removed -either because they do not feature in the report or to protect the individuals’ identities.

Date:
30 March 2016
Author:
Amnesty International
Ref:
MDE 22/3681/2016