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  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Facebook, Microsoft, LinkedIn and others must resist China’s Orwellian vision of the internet

Facebook, Microsoft, and LinkedIn are among the tech firms expected to be on a charm offensive with Chinese officials at the World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, which starts today. China has made clear to Western companies what tune they must dance to if they want to gain or keep access to the riches of the Chinese market, currently dominated by national players like Tencent and Sina. A new Cyber Security Law passed in China last week goes further than ever before in tightening the government’s already repressive grip on the internet, embodied by its “Great Firewall”.

Date:
16 November 2016
  • News
  • Kenya
  • Justice Systems

Kenya: Taiwanese nationals must not be deported to China

Kenyan authorities must not deport five Taiwanese nationals to China, where they face a real risk of human rights violations, said Amnesty International today. A judge in Nairobi acquitted today five men who hold Taiwanese passports of internet fraud. In her ruling, the judge ordered that the five who hold Taiwanese passports be returned to Taiwan. However, 45 other Taiwanese nationals involved in the same case were draped in black hoods and deported to China upon their acquittal in April, despite expressing fears of human rights violations.

Date:
5 August 2016
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

China: Assault on human rights lawyers and activists escalates with convictions after sham trials

The Chinese authorities must end their relentless suppression of human rights lawyers and activists, Amnesty International said today, after a prominent lawyer became the latest to be convicted after an unfair trial. On Thursday, Zhou Shifeng was sentenced to seven years in prison after being found guilty of “subverting state power”, following a trial that lasted less than a day at Tianjin No. 2 People’s Court in north east China.

Date:
4 August 2016
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

China: End relentless repression against human rights lawyers on first anniversary of crackdown

Chinese authorities must end their ruthless assault against human rights lawyers and activists, Amnesty International said ahead of the first anniversary of the start of an unprecedented crackdown. At least 248 human rights lawyers and activists were targeted during the nationwide sweep which began on 9 July 2015. One year on, 17 individuals caught up in the onslaught remain detained, eight of whom could face life imprisonment after being charged with “subverting state power”.

Date:
7 July 2016
  • News
  • China
  • Censorship and Free Speech

China: Scrap Foreign NGO law aimed at choking civil society

The Chinese government must scrap a new law aimed at further smothering civil society, Amnesty International said today. China’s National People’s Congress adopted on 28 April a fundamentally flawed law governing Foreign NGOs and their domestic partners. The new law will have severe consequences for freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association, which are already sharply curtailed under existing laws and policies.

Date:
28 April 2016
  • News
  • Middle East and North Africa
  • Death Penalty

Death penalty 2015: Alarming surge in recorded executions sees highest toll in more than 25 years

Dramatic surge in executions globally– highest number recorded by Amnesty International in more than 25 years Three countries – Iran, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia – responsible for almost 90% of all recorded executions For the first time ever, the majority of the world’s countries were abolitionist for all crimes after four more countries abolished the death penalty in 2015 A dramatic global rise in the number of executions recorded in 2015 saw more people put to death than at any point in the last quarter-century.

Date:
6 April 2016
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Censorship and Free Speech

China: Prominent blogger’s family detained over letter lambasting President Xi

The Chinese authorities must call off their manhunt against those it believes are behind the publication of a letter calling on President Xi Jinping to resign, Amnesty International said, after it was revealed close family members of a prominent dissident are the latest to have been detained. Chinese blogger and government critic, Wen Yunchao, 45, who currently lives in New York, said on Friday that his mother, Qiu Xiaohua, 65, father, Wen Shaogan, 72, and younger brother Wen Yun’ao, 41, were taken away by police in Guangdong province, southern China on 22 March.

Date:
25 March 2016
  • News
  • China
  • Censorship and Free Speech

China: Authorities’ revelations on detained Hong Kong booksellers “smoke and mirrors”

The Chinese authorities are showing total contempt for due process and the rule of law in the case of five detained Hong Kong booksellers, Amnesty International said, after police in Guangdong in southern China confirmed that three of the men missing since last October are in their custody and being investigated. Guangdong police confirmed late on Thursday that Lui Por, Cheung Chi-ping and Lam Wing-kee are suspected of “illegal activity”.

Date:
5 February 2016
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

China: Authorities intensify crackdown against critics with deplorable jail terms for rights activists

Three Chinese human rights campaigners who were handed jail sentences on Friday for publishing books on democracy and activism are the latest victims of politically motivated “national security” charges used to silence government critics, Amnesty International said. Tang Jingling, 44, Yuan Xinting, 44, and Wang Qingying, 31, were convicted by Guangzhou Municipal Intermediate People’s Court for “inciting subversion of state power”, and were sentenced to five years, three-and-a-half years and two-and-a-half years in jail respectively.

Date:
29 January 2016
  • News
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Children

Exposed: Child labour behind smart phone and electric car batteries

Major electronics brands, including Apple, Samsung and Sony, are failing to do basic checks to ensure that cobalt mined by child labourers has not been used in their products, said Amnesty International and Afrewatch in a report published today. The report, This is what we die for: Human rights abuses in the Democratic Republic of the Congo power the global trade in cobalt, traces the sale of cobalt, used in lithium-ion batteries, from mines where children as young as seven and adults work in perilous conditions.

Date:
19 January 2016
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Censorship and Free Speech

Hundreds of academics urge China’s President to free Professor Ilham Tohti

Four hundred academics from across the world have called on China’s President Xi Jinping to immediately release Uighur Professor Ilham Tohti, on the second anniversary of the day he was taken into custody by authorities. In an open letter to President Xi, scholars from globally recognized academic institutions - including Harvard University, The University of Hong Kong, and the University of Oxford, among many others - write that the immediate and unconditional release of Professor Ilham Tohti would be “an important way of demonstrating China’s commitment to academic freedom”.

Date:
15 January 2016
  • News
  • China
  • Human Rights Defenders and Activists

China: Guilty verdict against lawyer Pu Zhiqiang a gross injustice

The three year suspended prison sentence handed down against human rights lawyer Pu Zhiqiang is a deliberate attempt by the Chinese authorities to shackle a champion of freedom of expression, Amnesty International said today. On Tuesday, a court in Beijing sentenced Pu Zhiqiang to three years in prison, suspended for three years, for “picking quarrels and provoking troubles” and “inciting ethnic hatred”.

Date:
22 December 2015
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Internet and Social Media

Tech companies must reject China’s repressive internet rules

Tech firms must reject the Chinese authorities’ efforts to influence global internet governance in ways that would curb freedom of expression and exacerbate human rights abuses, Amnesty International said ahead of China hosting a major internet summit. President Xi Jinping is expected to address senior executives of global tech firms attending the three-day World Internet Conference in Wuzhen, eastern China, which starts on Wednesday.

Date:
15 December 2015
  • News
  • Asia and The Pacific
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

China: Harsh prison sentences against Guo Feixiong and two other activists the latest act of political persecution

The six-year prison sentence against leading Chinese human rights campaigner Guo Feixiong for his peaceful advocacy of human rights and political reforms is a clear-cut act of political persecution, said Amnesty International today, as it called for his and two other activists immediate and unconditional release. Guo Feixiong, 48, the better-known pen-name of writer and human rights advocate Yang Maodong, was convicted of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order in a public place” and “picking quarrels and provoking trouble”, by a court in Guangzhou, southern China.

Date:
27 November 2015
  • News
  • China
  • Unfair Trials

China: Torture and forced confessions rampant amid systematic trampling of lawyers’ rights

China’s criminal justice system is still heavily reliant on forced confessions obtained through torture and ill-treatment, with lawyers who persist in raising claims of abuse often threatened, harassed, or even detained and tortured themselves, Amnesty International said in a new report released today. The report, No End in Sight, documents how criminal justice reforms hailed as human rights advances by the Chinese government have in reality done little to change the deep-rooted practice of torturing suspects to extract forced confessions.

Date:
12 November 2015
  • News
  • China
  • Torture and other ill-treatment

China: Reform of one-child policy not enough

Chinese women will remain at risk of intrusive forms of contraception and coerced or forced abortions, despite the authorities announcing a change to the country’s decades-long one-child policy, Amnesty International said today. State media reported today that all urban married couples will now be allowed to have two children instead of one. “The move to change China’s one-child policy is not enough. Couples that have two children could still be subjected to coercive and intrusive forms of contraception, and even forced abortions – which amount to torture,” said William Nee, China Researcher at Amnesty International.

Date:
29 October 2015