Fiji: Whistleblower attacked by men in police uniform

Responding to a second attack on a Fijian businessman and whistleblower, Amnesty International said:

“This is the second time that Rajneel Singh, a Fijian businessman who had alerted the authorities to politically sensitive computer files, has been attacked by men dressed in police uniforms in less than a year. This alarming development is the latest in a series of allegations of torture and other ill-treatment by the Fijian police,” said Rafendi Djamin, Amnesty International’s Director for South East Asia and the Pacific.

“The authorities must ensure that Rajneel Singh, his family and lawyer are effectively protected from any form of violence and intimidation, and that the recent attacks against him are promptly investigated.”

This alarming development is the latest in a series of allegations of torture and other ill-treatment by the Fijian police
Rafendi Djamin, Amnesty International's Director for South East Asia and the Pacific

Background

In a climate of impunity, complaints against Fijian police and security forces are rarely investigated or prosecuted effectively.

Rajneel Singh’s lawyer has said that there is a video apparently showing the attack at the hands of the Fijian police. A police jacket was left behind at the scene.

The Fijian police have said that they are investigating the attack.

Rajneel Singh, an internet cafe owner, was first attacked in November 2015, after he discovered computer files that included purported plans to destabilise the government. Rajneel Singh has said that he alerted the authorities to the computer files, only to find himself assaulted by them.

Key Facts

Over the last five years, Amnesty has reported torture in at least three quarters of the world - 141 countries.

44%

Nearly half of respondents fear torture if taken into custody.

80%

More than 80% want strong laws to protect them from torture.

1/3

More than a 1/3 of people believe torture can be justified.