Rapport 2013
La situation des droits humains dans le monde

30 septembre 2011

Banning of Belgrade Pride is a dark day for human rights in Serbia

Banning of Belgrade Pride is a dark day for human rights in Serbia

The Serbian authorities' decision to ban Sunday's Belgrade Pride event is a “dark day for human rights”, Amnesty International said today.

The Serbian National Security Council today said the Pride march would not be held due to security threats from extremist right-wing groups, who had reportedly threatened violence and arson throughout the city if the event went ahead.

“The Serbian authorities, as they did in 2009, have bowed to pressure from right-wing groups who have failed to understand or respect the rights to freedom of expression set out in the Serbian constitution and law,” said Sian Jones, Balkans Researcher at Amnesty International.

Amnesty International considers the banning of Pride to be a huge step back for human rights in Serbia, and a massive government concession to right wing nationalist groups, in particular Dveri and Obraz, who have orchestrated opposition to the Pride. 

“Again the government has put pressure on the organizers to cancel the Pride march, instead of supporting them by guaranteeing their rights. Instead of rainbow flags in Serbia, it is a dark day for human rights,” said Sian Jones.

This is the fourth time that Pride has been planned in Belgrade. In 2010, police protected participants against more than 5,000 violent counter-demonstrators and damage to property was estimated at more than €1 million. In 2009, the Pride march did not take place after the authorities refused to provide security at the last moment following threats from far-right groups.

Belgrade’s Mayor has refused to support the Pride, saying that the event is a risk for “property, members of gay population, the police and citizens of Belgrade”.

Amnesty International considers that the prohibition of a Pride march violates the Serbian government’s obligations to guarantee freedom of expression and assembly. Further, the organization fears that the prohibition of the Pride, in the context of threats from homophobic groups, gives a green light to those who seek to deny the rights of LGBT people, and undermines the right to non-discrimination.

“This is a huge step back for human rights in Serbia and a massive concession to right-wing nationalist groups, in particular Dveri and Obraz, who have orchestrated opposition to the Pride,” said Sian Jones. 

Pour en savoir plus :

Amnesty International supports the Belgrade Pride (Public statement, 28 September 2011)
Serbia: Belgrade pride must go ahead (Urgent action, 26 August 2011)

 

 

Thème

Discrimination 
Liberté d'expression 
Orientation sexuelle et identité de genre  

Pays

Serbie 

Région ou pays

Europe et Asie centrale 

@amnestyonline sur Twitter

Nouvelles

21 août 2014

Les mineurs accusés d’être des membres de groupes armés dans le cadre du conflit qui perdure au Mali croupissent dans des prisons pour adultes, tandis que les violations des... Pour en savoir plus »

11 août 2014

Les familles de milliers de civils afghans tués par les forces américaines et de l’OTAN en Afghanistan ont été privées de justice, écrit Amnesty International dans un nouveau... Pour en savoir plus »

11 août 2014

Les familles de milliers de civils afghans tués par les forces américaines et de l’OTAN en Afghanistan ont été privées de justice, écrit Amnesty International dans un nouveau... Pour en savoir plus »

21 août 2014

Après avoir fui leur pays et survécu à une traversée périlleuse de la Méditerranée, les migrants africains en Italie tombent aux mains de trafiquants

Pour en savoir plus »
29 août 2014

Le militant pacifiste Mohamed Bachir Arab est détenu au secret depuis qu'il a été arrêté par les services de renseignement syriens le 2 novembre 2011. Il fait partie des... Pour en savoir plus »