Document - Guantánamo: 11 years in numbers

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL �MEDIA BRIEFING ��AI index: AMR 51/002/2013

08 January 2013 ��Guantánamo: 11 years in numbers �FIGURES �11 - Years since first transfers of detainees to the US detention centre in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. ��166 - Guantánamo detainee population as of 8 January 2013. Almost half are Yemeni nationals. ��779 – According to the authorities, the number of detainees who have been held in Guantánamo, the vast majority without charge or criminal trial. ��600 – Approximate number of detainees transferred from Guantánamo to other countries since 2002 ��9 - Detainees have died while in US custody in Guantánamo, the most recent in September 2012. According to the authorities, seven of the deaths were found to be suicides, while two were the result of natural causes. ��12 - Guantánamo detainees who were under 18 years old when taken into custody. ��1 – Number of Guantánamo detainees transferred to the US mainland for trial in US federal court ��7 – Number of detainees convicted by military commission, five as a result of pre-trial agreements under which they pled guilty, four of whom have been repatriated. ��6 - Detainees currently facing the possibility of death sentences after unfair trial by military commission. ��In 2010 the Obama administration's Guantánamo Review Task Force revealed that of the 240 detainees at Guantánamo at that time, 36 were under active investigation with a view to prosecution, while it had been determined that 48 others would neither be released nor tried, but would be held in indefinite detention. The Task Force report further said that 126 detainees had been cleared for transfer out of the prison (44 of whom had been transferred to other countries by the time the Task Force’s report was published). In September 2012, the US authorities made public a list of 55 detainees still held who had been cleared for transfer, while noting that this list did not include those whose transfer status was under seal. In a US federal court ruling in October 2012, a 56th detainee cleared for transfer was identified. ��OTHER FACTS �On 16 October 2012, the conviction by military commission of one of the two detainees in whose case there had not been a pre-trial agreement and who had therefore gone to trial was overturned by a US appeals court which found that “material support for terrorism” was not a war crime under US law at the time of his alleged conduct for which he was tried under the Military Commissions Act of 2006. ��Regardless of the US government's categories, under international law and human rights standards, all Guantánamo detainees must either be immediately released to countries (including, potentially, the USA) that will respect their human rights unless they are to be charged with recognizably criminal offences and tried fairly in an ordinary civilian court. Amnesty International opposes any recourse to the death penalty. ��