Document - Moldova: Amnesty International welcomes the commitment to fight against torture and other ill-treatment, and calls for the adoption of the Anti-Discrimination Law without further delay

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL

PUBLIC STATEMENT

AI Index: EUR 59/002/2012

16 March 2012

Moldova : Amnesty International welcomes the commitment to fight against torture and other ill-treatment, and calls for the adoption of the Anti-Discrimination Law without further delay

Human Rights Council adopts Universal Periodic Review outcome on Moldova

Amnesty International continues to receive reports of torture and other ill-treatment taking place in Moldova. The organization therefore welcomes the government’s commitment to combat torture and other ill-treatment, as recommended by several states during the review in the Working Group.

The illustrative case of Evgenie Fedoruk has come to Amnesty International’s attention. He reported that he was held for two months in police detention, starting in April 2011, and tortured during this time by police to force him to confess to a murder. He said that his hands and feet were tied together and that he was suspended from a rope in this position and given electric shocks to his legs and the soles of his feet. He was subsequently transferred to a psychiatric hospital where he is still being held.

Amnesty International is concerned that there has been little progress in prosecuting police officers responsible for torture and other ill-treatment during the events following the elections in April 2009. Out of 128 complaints received by the Prosecutor General’s Office, to date only 45 have reached the courts and only three police officers have been convicted. In all three cases the officers received suspended sentences.

During her visit to Moldova in November 2011, the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights stressed the need to enact a comprehensive anti-discrimination law without delay. In the UPR Working Group examination, this call was echoed by no less than 13 States. There are high levels of intolerance and discrimination towards sexual minorities, the disabled, Roma and HIV positive people. Amnesty International has repeatedly documented violations of the right to freedom of assembly of LGBT activists, and has recently received reports of refusal of medical treatment to HIV positive patients, and limited access to education for physically disabled children. Amnesty International urges the government of Moldova to adopt without further delay the Anti-Discrimination Law which has been under discussion for almost five years.

Background

The UN Human Rights Council adopted the outcome of the Universal Periodic Review of Moldova on 16 March during its 19th session. Prior to the adoption of the report of the review Amnesty International delivered the oral statement above. Amnesty International also contributed to the information basis of the review through its submission on Moldova:

http://www.amnesty.org/en/library/info/EUR59/001/2011/en

Public Document

International Secretariat, Amnesty International, 1 Easton St., London WC1X 0DW, UK www.amnesty.org

A/HRC/19/19, recommendations 73.29 (France), 73.45 (United Kingdom), 73.46 (Slovenia) and 73.48 (Germany).

UN Media Statement, 4 November 2011, available at: HYPERLINK "http://www.un.md/news_room/pr/2011/04_11/index.shtml" http://www.un.md/news_room/pr/2011/04_11/index.shtml (accessed 15 February 2012).

A/HRC/19/19, recommendations 73.6 (Russia), 73.24 (Poland), 73.28 (Sweden), 75.3 (Norway), 75.4 (France), 75.5 (Canada), 75.6 (Estonia), 75.7 (United Kingdom), 75.8 (United States), 75.9 (Romania), 75.10 (Argentina), 75.11 (Mexico) and 75.12 (Slovakia).

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