Document - Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: Oral intervention at the 22nd session of the UN Human Rights Council

Assault on dissent thrives in Sri Lanka’s climate of impunity:

image1.wmf Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: Oral intervention at the 22nd session of the UN Human Rights Council (25 February – 22 March 2013)

AI Index: ASA 24/007/2013

11 March 2013

Item 4: Human Rights situations that require the Council’s attention

Interactive Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea

Mr. President,

Amnesty International welcomes the Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. The report’s identification of nine underlying patterns of violations provides a useful framework to understand the breadth and gravity of human rights violations in the DPRK. Amnesty International particularly welcomes the report’s call for the establishment of an inquiry mechanism with adequate resources to investigate and more fully document grave, systematic and widespread human rights violations in the DPRK.

Analysis of new satellite images of the area near Political Prison Camp (kwanliso) 14 in Kaechon shows that the government is blurring the line between such camps and civilians in the surrounding vicinity.� Based on satellite imagery analysis done in February 2013 of the Choma-bong valley which is adjacent to the political prison camp kwanliso 14, Amnesty International has observed increased security in the form of controlled access points, raising of guard towers and construction of a perimeter around the valley. The activity points to a tightening in the control of movement of the local population adjacent to kwanliso 14. Testimonies by survivors of kwanliso have consistently claimed that serious human rights violations such as forced hard labour, denial of detainees’ food quota as punishment, torture or other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment are imposed on the inmates within these facilities. The blurring of lines between kwanliso inmates and the surrounding population raises fears for the population within the perimeter about the current conditions they face and the North Korean government’s future intentions for the valley and those who live there. These new satellite images reinforce that it is imperative that an international Commission of Enquiry be established to investigate and document the grave, systematic and widespread human rights violations that continue in the DPRK.

Thank you Mr. President.

� http://www.amnesty.org/en/news/north-korea-new-images-show-blurring-prison-camps-and-villages-2013-03-07

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